presenters

 

Friday | 2:10 PM - 3:00 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

INTRODUCTION TO FEMTECHNET’S DOCC & CONFERENCE OVERVIEW

Welcome to the Conference 
by Lisa Nakamura

Introduction to the Conference and DOCC Pedagogical Experiments
by Karen Keifer-Boyd

DOCC Wikistorming
by Veronica Paredes

FemTechNet Hactivism
by Karl Surkan

FemTechNet signal/noise
by T.L. Cowan

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Lisa Nakamura

Lisa Nakamura is the Gwendolyn Calvert Baker Collegiate Professor of American Cultures at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  She is the Coordinator of the Digital Studies Program at the University of Michigan and a proud former co-Faciliator of FemTechNet.  She has been researching racism, sexism, the Internet, and gaming since 1995 and her books and open-access shorter pieces are available at lisanakamura.net.   Tweet her at @lnakamur.  

Karen Keifer-Boyd

Karen Keifer-Boyd is professor of art education and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Penn State. Her website is http://www.personal.psu.edu/ktk2. Tweet her at @chutneypower.  

Marla Jaksch

Dr. Marla Jaksch is an associate professor in the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department, with affiliate appointments in the African American Studies Department and the International Studies Program's Africa concentration at The College of New Jersey. Her research interests include neocolonialism, development, and digital cultures; science and technology studies in sub-Saharan Africa; and transnational feminisms and digital media.   

Veronica Paredes

Veronica Paredes is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Media and Cinema Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she is also affiliated with the Culture and Society thematic area at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). She is a 2015-2016 FemTechNet co-facilitator, along with Anne Cong-Huyen, T.L. Cowan, Paula Gardner and Jasmine Rault. She co-chairs the collective’s Tech Praxis and Wikipedia working groups and is an active member of the Critical Race and Ethnic Studies Committee.  

Karl Surkan

Karl Surkan has been teaching in the Program in Women's and Gender Studies at MIT for the past 11 years and loves to try out new pedagogical experiments! His research interests include new media activism and online social movements, feminist media studies, technology studies, queer/trans politics and representation, reproductive technologies, and most recently wearable technologies and epatient communities and health activism.  

T.L. Cowan

T.L. Cowan is a writer, performer, activist and professor whose work focuses on the cultural and intellectual economies and social lives of trans- feminist and queer media & performance, and on contemporary digital cultures, labour, affect, politics and pedagogies. T.L. is the 2015-2016 Bicentennial Canadian Visiting Lecturer at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies and Digital Humanities Fellow at Yale University. T.L. is currently a co-facilitator of the Feminist Technology Network (part of the #F5 co-facilitator collective). T.L.'s website is tlcowan.net and twitter handle is @AgingSupermodel.  
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Friday | 3:15 PM - 4:15 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

Porcus Oeconomicus: Labor, Feminism and Biopolitics of the Smithfield Pig

This paper will look at how social media and feminist performance art can be employed to understand the patriarchal and biopolitical effects created by Smithfield pigs (for both human and nonhuman populations), who seemingly have zero agency in these confined environments and are genetically formulated to be the perfect homo oecomonicus. 
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Lindsay Garcia

Lindsay Garcia is an artist and second year PhD student in American Studies at the College of William and Mary with a specialization in political art, art history, activism, the built environment, and animal studies. Garcia holds a BFA in Sculpture from Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), an MA in Contemporary Art from Sotheby’s Institute of Art, an MFA in Visual Art from SUNY Purchase, and an MA in American Studies from the College of William and Mary.
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Friday | 3:15 PM - 4:15 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

Build, Buy, or Modernize: Mechanization of America’s Kitchen 1900-1959

Culminating in the 1959 Kitchen Debate between Nixon and Khrushchev at the American National Exhibition in Moscow through exchanges on political ideologies and questions of progress, affordability, and efficiency, this paper engages in the discourse of the kitchen and its role in defining public and private life, traditional and modern practices in an increasingly urbanized and industrialized society. 
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Khanh Vo

Khanh Vo is a second year MA/PhD student in the American Studies Program at the College of William and Mary. Vo's research interests are in 19th and 20th century American history, material culture, social history of science and technology, gender studies in concert with questions of labor, and food studies.
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Friday | 3:15 PM - 4:15 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

ARRAYPROJECT&&

Our presentation will briefly present our motivations, step through the front and back of ArrayProject for context,and present some of the research finding generated through the monthly listerv themes.

Array Project Website

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JESSICA PARRIS WESTBROOK & ADAM TROWBRIDGE

Jessica Westbrook is an Associate Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Westbrook collaborates with Adam Trowbridge as Channel TWo (CH2), an award winning new media studio. CH2 has published, exhibited, and screened their art and design work nationally and internationally.
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Friday | 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Building the Feminist Cyborg Collective

How can we create accessible, inclusive and diverse communities? It is not enough to allow, it is not enough to invite, an inclusive space and culture must actively be dug out and constructed. This is community building in Makerspaces through a cyborg lens.
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Lindy Wilkins

Lindy Wilkins is a feminist cyborg and Maker currently based in Toronto. As co-founder of Make Friends TO, Community Technologist at STEAMLabs, and Director at Site 3 coLaboratory, Lindy’s work centres around inclusivity and diversity in technology based DIY organizations. They hold an MFA from OCAD University, as well as a BFA from Concordia University. Between adventures in collaborative exploration, Lindy spends their time cycling, building whimsical robots, and being a general enthusiast.
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Friday | 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Wind Her Up; Watch Her Dance: The Mechanization of the Hula Girl in Twentieth Century America

This presentation identifies the ways in which mechanized “Hula Girl” toys were one of the first examples of humanoid robots tasked with performing affective labor for millions of Americans. In turn, these “primitive” androids shaped and were shaped by the American imaginary about Pacific Islanders as gendered, raced, commoditized, and objectified.
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Leah M. Kuragano

Leah Kuragano is an an alumna of Bennington College in Vermont and a graduate student in American Studies at the College of William & Mary. Her more recent research interests concern the American Pacific Island imaginary in literature, visual art, and music at the turn of the century and onward.
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Friday | 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Calling to Talk and Listening Well: The Multimedia Practices of Feminist Telephone Hotlines

This presentation will consider some of the challenges and methodological directions for mapping feminist communications systems through archival documents. More specifically, I will present current research from a chapter of the book manuscript I working on, which is a media history of lesbian-feminist information activism from the 1970s to the present.
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Cait McKinney

Cait McKinney is the Media@McGill postdoctoral fellow at McGill University, Montreal, where she also teaches at the Institute for Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies. Cait’s research examines feminist and LGBTQ social movement media infrastructure, emphasizing late 20th-century digital transitions. Recent writing appears in Feminist Theory, the Radical History Review, and No More Potlucks.
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Friday | 5:45 PM - 6:45 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Creativity and Subjectivity in Social Media Activism

Social media activism furthers feminist and intersectional understandings of identity, hybridity, surveillance, and community, and reveals how subjectivity, technology, and creativity are co-constitutive categories.
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Ellen Moll

Ellen Moll specializes in feminist technoscience, digital cultures, intersectionality, diaspora, and contemporary literature by women. She works as teaching faculty and in curriculum development for the College of Arts and Letters at Michigan State University.
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Friday | 5:45 PM - 6:45 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Feminist Advocacy and Privacy Management

This paper expands research surrounding the online practice of doxing, and its possible impacts on feminist discourse, community, and identity.
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Jade Metzger

Jade Metzger is a PhD student in communication studies at Wayne State University. She coaches individual events for WSU’s Speech and Debate Team. She received her BS from Ball State University where she was a speech competitor for three years. Jade’s scholarly interest examines the disclosure of stigmatized identities and the reaction of communities to stigma and individual management of marginalization.  

Stine Eckert

Stine Eckert is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Wayne State University. Her research interests include the intersections of social media, gender and minorities in U.S. and European contexts.
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Friday | 5:45 PM - 6:45 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Bridging with STEAM/M: Engaging Activists, Academics and Creative Industry in Transformative ICT Practice

Gardner discusses her proposed research project, involving FTN, that incorporates critical media and digital theory as well as feminist theory in the development of a STEAM/M approach. This paper demonstrates how key concepts, such as those developed by Suchman (situated learning), Haraway (diffraction) and Barad (interference) usefully crack open new understandings of ICT/M practices that can lead to socially response innovation and creation as well as changes that respect and value womens’ diverse practices in these spaces.
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Paula Gardner

Paula Gardner is Asper Chair in Communications, in the Department of Communication Studies and Multimedia at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Gardner is a critical feminist media scholar who writes about the ambivalent relationships we have with technologies, particularly biometric devices. Her participatory, multimedia research employs digital and biometric devices critically, seeking to render them accessible and transparent, to engage them in socially interventionist practices, and to consider the abetting role of the aesthetic.
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Friday | 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)

  

SIGNAL/NOISE LAUNCH PARTY

Please join the editors of the signal/noise publication, in celebrating the launch of our inaugural issue, and the amazing work being done by faculty, students, and other participants of FemTechNet DOCCs since 2013!
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[ signal/noise editorial collective ]  

T.L. Cowan

T.L. Cowan is a writer, performer, activist and professor whose work focuses on the cultural and intellectual economies and social lives of trans- feminist and queer media & performance, and on contemporary digital cultures, labour, affect, politics and pedagogies. T.L. is the 2015-2016 Bicentennial Canadian Visiting Lecturer at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies and Digital Humanities Fellow at Yale University. T.L. is currently a co-facilitator of the Feminist Technology Network (part of the #F5 co-facilitator collective). T.L.'s website is tlcowan.net and twitter handle is @AgingSupermodel.  

Juliana Luchkiw

Juliana Luchkiw is a hybrid creature, interested in intertwining agential affinities of fiction, theory, and lived experience. Her work evokes specters of deviance and abject beings by relating to memory and trauma, and drawing constellations that echo silenced bodies with text, performativity, video, sound, collage, interactive creatures and an-architecture. printmaking, design, and web-based projects are also a part of her practice. She is a part of nadahada collective, and she has a BA in The Arts from Eugene Lang College and BFA in Communication Design from Parsons School of Design.  

Marcea Decker

Marcea Decker is a graphic designer, illustrator, animator and sometimes lecturer currently based in NYC, where she earned her Master’s of Science from Parsons The New School for Design. Her work and interests are inspired by the transformative power of art, visual communication, and design. On a typical day you can find her playing too many video games, drawing cartoons, and 3D printing both useful & useless pieces of plastic.  

Skylar Maguire

Skylar Maguire is an organizer, filmmaker, drummer, and amateur game designer from Vermont. Currently living and going to school in New York City, they study Media and Culture with double minors in Gender Studies and Global Studies. Now a retired barista, they enjoy life as dog walker, doggie day care attendant, and volunteer cat caretaker– an unpaid position where they attempt to feed and/or befriend the neighborhood strays.  

Pallavi Guha

Pallavi Guha has been a professional journalist and media educator for more than a decade. Pallavi has worked internationally for leading media organizations including BBC News and television in London and The Times of India in India. As a journalist Pallavi reported on politics and education including the social changes in UK during the Blair administration, parliamentary elections in India, winners of Special Olympics among others. Pallavi has been an instructor and teaching assistant; and taught several courses on gender, media and communication. Pallavi has majored in Political Science from Presidency College, Kolkata, India. She has two masters’ degrees, in International Relations from Jadavpur University, Kolkata and Communication from Rutgers University, NJ. She also has an M.Phil degree in International Relations from Jadavpur University, India. Pallavi's research interests include social media communication, gender, politics and media. Pallavi has presented her academic and professional work at national and international conferences. She has published peer reviewed articles and book chapters at the Feminist Media Studies and MIT Press.
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saturday | 10:15 aM - 1:00 PM 

// Hatcher Library Gallery Instruction Lab, North Side (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

WIKISTORMING WORKSHOP

Teaching WIKID GRRLS
A User Experience Approach to the Politics of Information Design

Coordinators of the WIKID GRRLS project, Jade Metzger and Stine Eckert, will provide a workshop on the WIKID GRRLS after school project for researchers, teachers, and school coordinators. The coordinators will talk about the transdisciplinary benefits of implementing the program, including creating alliances across the academic fields and community educators. Coordinators will also discuss the challenges of the program. The workshop provides space for conversations about STEM education with young girls in urbanized areas, closing the gender gap on Wikipedia, and Wikistorming. The second half of the 3 hour wikistorming workshop will be facilitated by Marta Delatte beginning with her presentation of her research on a user experience approach to the politics of information design. After the presentation the group will be invited to be the first testers of an app that it is being developed to improve the exploration experience of underprivileged communities in creative archives such as wikipedia. Two features of the app will be collaboratively tested: knowledge maps and feedback buttons. The whole workshop it is being named “The wishlist” because participants will be able to communicate how they prefer to explore creative archives.

WIKID GRRLS Project Website 

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Marta Delatte

Journalist, digital curator and researcher, Marta Delatte is currently the recipient of a Doctoral Scholarship at the Media and Memory Research Initiative of the University of Hull (UK). All her academic and professional experiences are related to the study of contemporary narratives, digital culture and feminisms.  

Jade Metzger

Jade Metzger is a PhD student in communication studies at Wayne State University. She coaches individual events for WSU’s Speech and Debate Team. She received her BS from Ball State University where she was a speech competitor for three years. Jade’s scholarly interest examines the disclosure of stigmatized identities and the reaction of communities to stigma and individual management of marginalization.  

Stine Eckert

Stine Eckert is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Wayne State University. Her research interests include the intersections of social media, gender and minorities in U.S. and European contexts.
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saturday | 10:15 aM - 1:00 PM 

// Hatcher Library Gallery, North Side (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

EXQUISITE ENGENDERING WORKSHOP

Vibrant Lives DataPlay
Engendering Futures: Speculative Design, Play, Place and the Dreaming Collective 

Erin Manning, in her book, Politics of Touch, describes that “To engender is to undertake a reworking of form. To engender is to potentialize matter. Engendering involves potentiality at its most fertile: it calls forth the link between the incorporeal and the material, between the virtual and the actual” (2007, p. 90). The Exquisite Engendering Workshop begins with Vibrant Lives DataPlay, facilitated by Jacqueline Wernimont, Jessica Rajko, and Eileen Standley of Arizona State University. Participants engage with interactive sculptures developed by the facilitators that use mobile phone data to produce touch-based (haptic) feedback. Infrasonic subwoofers placed within the sculptures produce vibration feedback based on individual and aggregate data packets being sent and received through mobile phones. The data is de-identified and not permanently captured in order to protect privacy and security. This highly interactive session allows for participants to drop-by during the three-hour workshop to “play” as both recreation and performance. Vibrant Live DataPlay encourages participants to touch, hold, and play with both personal and collective data. In the second half of the workshop, Ash Eliza Smith presents Engendering Futures: Speculative Design, Play, Place and the Dreaming Collective. This workshop uses sci-fi, noir and dark comedy to create speculative design projects that re-imagine future possibilities. We will incorporate strategies from: Design Fiction, Ethnographic Surrealism’s genre-blurring use of play, and Situationism’s poetic use of psychogeography and drifting. This fictocritical realm allows for an immersive investigation of self and place and how it may be performed, embodied, and mythologized. We will discuss and build on two previous courses that were taught at the University of California, San Diego. Edgeland Futurism and Beach Bodies were cross-border and inter-disciplinary courses that drew on social, cultural, environmental, architectural, and historical elements to re-imagine the future of the California borderland region.
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Jacqueline Wernimont

Jacqueline Wernimont is an assistant professor of English and Digital Humanities at Arizona State University, where she specializes in literary history, feminist digital media, histories of quantification, and technologies of commemoration. 

Jessica Rajko

Jessica Rajko is a performer, choreographer and interdisciplinary digital media artist. As an assistant professor at Arizona State University, her current interests include whole body interaction design, wearable technology design for dance, feminist digital culture, and the human experience of big data. 

Eileen Standley

Eileen Standley is an artist and Clinical Professor who works with a variety of media in performance or installation settings. What she creates is predominantly influenced by her background as a choreographer and dancer. Her work crosses disciplines of dance making, video art, installation, and performance art. 

Ash Eliza Smith

Ash Eliza Smith is a multimedia artist and writer who has explored technology and the body for Vice, Motherboard and Rhizome. She is the current Director for Art and Technology in the Culture, Art and Technology Program at University of California, San Diego, where she teaches courses on storytelling, digital media, film, and speculative design.
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saturday | 10:15 aM - 1:00 PM 

// Hatcher Library Clark Instructional Space, South Side (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

FEMINIST MAPPING WORKSHOP

Feminist Mapping Principles & Practices
Mapping Food, Migration and Difference in Singapore 
A Feminist Mapping of Filmic Narratives
Mapping FemTechNet Landscape

In this workshop, Karen Keifer-Boyd begins with a discussion of feminist principles and practices of mapping and cartography from interacting with several examples, including FTN DOCC mapping projects. Two researchers, Kristy H.A. Kang at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, and Almudena Escribá Maroto, Universidad de Valencia, Spain, present how they use mapping to visualize overlooked histories of ethnic communities and how they claim space in the city, the relationships between politics of location and knowledge in terms of accountability/responsibility, the body, and ideological landmarks. Afterwards, Veronica Paredes and Ann Wu from FemTechNet’s Tech/Praxis Working Group will present a recent initiative of the working group to map FemTechNet’s landscape in terms of hybrid spaces, geographical locations, and privilege/access. The discussion and examples provide the context for experiencing four mapping activities: DOCC’s Situated Knowledges Mapping Project to make visible politics of location and identity; film analysis mapping, mapping potential to change, and mapping FemTechNet landscape.

Feminist Mapping Resources, Processes, Examples

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Karen Keifer-Boyd

Karen Keifer-Boyd is professor of art education and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Penn State. Her website is http://www.personal.psu.edu/ktk2. Tweet her at @chutneypower.  

Kristy H.A. Kang

Dr. Kristy H.A. Kang is a media artist and scholar whose work explores narratives of place and geographies of cultural memory. She is Assistant Professor at the School of Art, Design and Media at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and Associate Director of the Spatial Analysis Lab (SLAB) at the University of Southern California Sol Price School of Public Policy, Los Angeles. 

Almudena Escribá Maroto

Almudena Escribá Maroto, PhD student in Communication and Intercultural at Valencia University (Spain). Official Master in Communication, Intercultural and European Studies, and Graduate in Audiovisual Communication. Her thesis focuses on the discursive analysis of science fiction films using several theoretical fields, like biopolitics, queer, postmodern and poststructural gender theory. 

Veronica Paredes

Veronica Paredes is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Media and Cinema Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she is also affiliated with the Culture and Society thematic area at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). She is a 2015-2016 FemTechNet co-facilitator, along with Anne Cong-Huyen, T.L. Cowan, Paula Gardner and Jasmine Rault. She co-chairs the collective’s Tech Praxis and Wikipedia working groups and is an active member of the Critical Race and Ethnic Studies Committee.   

Ann (Hong-An) Wu

Ann (Hong-An) Wu is a community-based educator, new media artist, and doctoral candidate in art education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her dissertation examines the potential of transforming systems and structures with youth through prosumer development and critical play in community-based settings. Currently, Wu is serving as the Information and Communication Technology Specialist at FemTechNet. Her website is wuhongann.tw.
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saturday | 10:15 aM - 1:00 PM 

// Shapiro Design Lab, Shapiro Library (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

FEMINIST HACKERS WORKSHOP

Freedom Recycling Bin: The Game
FEM:play — Feminist Game Card Hack

Cricket Keating and Melissa Meade will start this workshop with their game Freedom Recycling Bin, developed with their students in their DOCC 2013 class. The game hacks recycling bins as well as the feminist history of “freedom trash cans” at the infamous 1968 Miss America protests to generate play, thought, and discussion about issues of oppression and freedom. They will consider ways to bring this game to our technologically mediated FemTechNet spaces, for play across the network. For the second half of the workshop, Paula Gardner and Emma Westecott will present FEM:play — Feminist Card Game Hack. This workshop presents a deck of cards containing feminist values, concepts and theory that can be played in numerous ways --to be invented by participants!  The game seeks to cross feminist theory into non-academic spaces and to work as a tool for women and transgender folk to address issues in employment, family and social spaces.  The workshop is inspired by three game approaches- Top Trumps, Grow-A-Game, and Metagame (expansion deck); these approaches offer, for example, points for confrontation or values identification rather than “dominating”, and encourage players to hack the rules. In the workshop participants will hack, alter or rebuild the deck to create games we can use ourselves.
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Cricket Keating

Cricket Keating is an Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Ohio State University. 

Melissa Meade

Melissa Meade is an Associate Professor and Chair of Humanities at Colby-Sawyer College. 

Paula Gardner

Paula Gardner is Asper Chair in Communications, in the Department of Communication Studies and Multimedia at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Gardner is a critical feminist media scholar who writes about the ambivalent relationships we have with technologies, particularly biometric devices. Her participatory, multimedia research employs digital and biometric devices critically, seeking to render them accessible and transparent, to engage them in socially interventionist practices, and to consider the abetting role of the aesthetic. 

Emma Westecott

Emma Westecott is Assistant Professor in the Digital Futures Program at OCAD University, Toronto. Emma Westecott's practice-based research celebrates digital games as an expressive art form, considering its potential to extend, enhance and conceive of game forms in new and creative ways. With expertise in arts games, her research focuses on the ongoing, creative evolution of the game form, that can offer new experiences and new human possibilities.
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saturday | 2:00 pM - 5:00 PM 

// Hatcher Library Gallery Instruction Lab, North Side (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

FEMINIST ACTIVISTS WORKSHOP

What’s A Digital Feminist? Experiences of Gender and Labor in the Digital Humanities at the University of North Carolina
Technology, Politics & Play: Understanding the Pedagogical and Political Value of Tinkering

In the Feminist Activists Workshop, Charlotte Fryar and Malina Chavez introduce their research collective, The Digital Feminists of Carolina (DFC), and their case-study of the gendered division of labor in digital humanities. After presenting video clips from interviews, the DFC will discuss their feminist analysis of the themes in the interviews regarding perceptions of collaborative work and how the identity politics of digital labor are both complicated and supported by feminist practices. DFC will then facilitate a discussion with participants on community-building, collaboration, and labor-saving practices that could be enacted by workshop participants at their home institution and have participants practice interviewing skills by asking research questions with each other. Next, in the second half of the workshop, Jessi Ring introduces tinkering, a valuable learning process that disrupts elitist and masculinist innovation narratives by making scientific and technological learning more accessible, collaborative, playful and practical. The tinkering and games, explored in this workshop, demonstrate a unique approach to understanding intersections between various identities and cultural contexts and a wide range of technologies or technological processes – including or related to disability, surveillance, research ethics, and privacy.
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Charlotte Fryar

Charlotte Fryar is a Ph.D. student in the Department of American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). From 2011-2015, Charlotte worked for UNC’s Digital Innovation Lab, which strives to create digital humanities work as public goods. The idea that digital work can and should be public work has influenced how she thinks about digital labor and collaborative project-building. Her primary research interests are in public higher education, campus activism(s), oral history, and new modes of digital scholarship. 

Malina Chavez

Malina Chavez is Program Coordinator for the Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative. With a MFA|EDA from Duke University, she has been a PhD Lab Artist in Residence, teaching assistant in Information Science + Studies (Web Multimedia), Experimental Film, and Cathy Davidson’s groundbreaking Coursera MOOC, The History (and Future) of Higher Education. Her most recent work uses open source surveillance applications to create poetic film and installation projects. 

Jessi Ring

Jessi Ring is a third year PhD student in the Communications program at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada). Her dissertation research explores multiple issues associated with feminist activism, including the binary between politics and play, by exploring American and Canadian feminist hackerspaces.
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saturday | 2:00 pM - 5:00 PM 

// Hatcher Library Gallery, North Side (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

FEMINIST WRITERS WORKSHOP

HAPLAB – Horror and Possibility Sci-Fi Workshop 
Pedagogies of Promotion

This workshop will feature three one-hour interactive sessions. Sophia Bruecker begins with HAPLAB - Horror and Possibility Sci-Fi Workshop to facilitate experimental creative writing using the genre of science fiction. The stories often end up as seeds for later projects. Li Cornfeld continues with Pedagogies of Promotion, experimenting with performative presentations of media technologies. Beginning with an examination of product promotion as a form of capitalist pedagogy, this session will play with strategies for reimagining promotional performances as feminist acts.
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Sophia Brueckner

Sophia Brueckner is an artist, designer, and engineer. Inseparable from computers since the age of two, she believes she is a cyborg. She graduated from MIT and RISD and is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan where she teaches sci-fi and researches the effects of interface design on mental health. 

Li Cornfeld

Li Cornfeld is a PhD candidate at McGill University, where she researches the intersections of media studies and performance studies. Her dissertation investigates live presentations of new technologies in industrial settings: product launches, keynote addresses, trade shows and expos.
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saturday | 2:00 pM - 5:00 PM 

// Shapiro Design Lab, Shapiro Library (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

feminist hackers workshop

Teaching with Twine: An Affective Tool for Exploring Identity 

Twine is an extraordinarily accessible game-making platform based on hypertext narrative; as such, it can be easily used as a pedagogical tool with which to enable students to work through a range of scenarios involving decisions and their repercussions. The affordances of Twine in creating an interactive narrative based on user choices mean it can function as an affective exercise for both makers and players, as they learn what it means to operate from particular identity positions in different societal contexts or scenarios. This workshop led by Karl Surkan explores some examples of student Twine games generated in a DOCC titled “Technology and Culture” at MIT, in which the assignment charged students to explore a technology as it is seen or used in a particular cultural context. Because Twine is a platform that is very good at creating an affective experience for the user, it is therefore helpful in exploring implications of many aspects of user experience – specifically how and by whom technologies are used. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to work with the Twine platform and discuss how to incorporate in their teaching, and collaboratively in future DOCCs.
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Karl Surkan

Karl Surkan has been teaching in the Program in Women's and Gender Studies at MIT for the past 11 years and loves to try out new pedagogical experiments! His research interests include new media activism and online social movements, feminist media studies, technology studies, queer/trans politics and representation, reproductive technologies, and most recently wearable technologies and epatient communities and health activism.
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saturday | 5:30 pM - 6:30 PM 

/// Michigan League, Ballroom (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

DOCCs in Action

The first Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC) was launched in 2013 by FemTechNet on the topic of “dialogues in feminism and technology.” A DOCC recognizes and is built on the understanding that expertise is distributed throughout a network, among participants situated in diverse institutional contexts, within diverse material, geographic, and national settings, and who embody and perform diverse identities. This session focuses on experimenting with the DOCC structure, and/or collaborating in its shared learning activities across courses. This full group gathering is an opportunity to highlight and share experiences from DOCC instructors teaching or facilitating this year, and to make connections to the concerns, rewards and challenges identified from previous iterations of the DOCC. Instructors from the DOCC’s past, present and future are enthusiastically invited to join the conversation!
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Anita Say Chan

Anita Say Chan is an Assistant Research Professor of Communications in the Department of Media and Cinema Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research and teaching interests include globalization and digital cultures, innovation networks and the “periphery”, science and technology studies in Latin America, and hybrid pedagogies in building digital literacies. She received her PhD in 2008 from the MIT Doctoral Program in History; Anthropology; and Science, Technology, and Society. Her first book the competing imaginaries of global connection and information technologies in network-age Peru, Networking Peripheries: Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism was released by MIT Press in 2014. 

Diana Mincyte

Diana Mincyte is an Assistant Professor of sociology in at The City University of New York - NYC College of Technology. Her research examines environmental and justice dimensions of agro-food systems in eastern Europe and the United States. Her publications include articles in Agriculture and Human Values, Sociologia Ruralis, Slavic Review, Gastronomica, Environment and Planning A and D, among others, book chapters, and several guest-edited special issues. 

Carrie Rentschler

Carrie Rentschler is Associate Professor and William Dawson Scholar of Feminist Media Studies in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University.  She is the author of Second Wounds: Victims’ Rights and the Media in the U.S. (Duke UP, 2011), and co-editor of Girlhood Studies and the Politics of Place (Berghahn Press, 2016). Her current research examines the construction of the bystander as an agent of social change, the role humour plays in feminist social media responses to rape culture, and the work media infrastructures and distribution do across a range of social movement activism.  

Marla Jaksch

Dr. Marla Jaksch is an associate professor in the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department, with affiliate appointments in the African American Studies Department and the International Studies Program's Africa concentration at The College of New Jersey. Her research interests include neocolonialism, development, and digital cultures; science and technology studies in sub-Saharan Africa; and transnational feminisms and digital media. 

Ivette Bayo Urban

Ivette Bayo Urban is a doctoral candidate at the Information School at University of Washington. Ivette believes in the liberatory and transformative power of information and education. Her scholarship focusing on community informatics, community based collaborative spaces and she is interested in boundary spanning work. Her work explores the complex relationships of technology access and use, from perspectives of cultures, identities and genders. She is a feminist and indigenist scholar attentive to the complex and uneven relations that are embedded in socio-technical systems. Ivette an affiliate member of the Indigenous Information Research Group (IIRG), and co-chair of FemTechNet’s Pedagogy Projects Committee.
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sunday | 10:00 aM - 11:00 aM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

KEYNOTE DIALOGUE: “Organic Intellectualism: DJ Scholarship, Black Feminism and Erasure Resistance”

DJ Lynnée Denise creates multi- dimensional and multi-sensory experiences that require audiences to apply critical thinking to how the arts can hold viable solutions to social inequality. Her work is inspired by underground cultural movements, the 1980s, migration studies, theories of escape, and electronic music of the African Diaspora. With support from the Jerome Foundation, The Astrae Lesbian Foundation for Justice, Idea Capital, The BiljmAIR artist residency (Netherlands) and The Rauschenberg Artists as Activists Grant, she has been able to resource her performative research on a local, national and global level. She’s the product of the Historically Black Fisk University with a MA from the historically radical San Francisco State University Ethnic Studies Department.
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Lynnee Denise

DJ Lynnée Denise is a Visiting Artist at California State University’s Pan African Studies Department and its Chicano Studies Department. DJ Lynnée Denise is an artist and scholar who incorporates self-directed project based research into interactive workshops, music events and public lectures that provide the opportunity to develop an intimate relationship with under-explored topics related to the cultural history of marginalized communities.

DJ Lynnee Denise Website

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SUNDAY | 11:30 aM - 12:30 PM 

// Michigan LeagueKoessler Room (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

DIALOGUE SESSION 1:
FTN DOCC
PEDAGOGICAL EXPERIMENTS

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Karen Keifer-Boyd

Karen Keifer-Boyd is professor of art education and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Penn State. Her website is http://www.personal.psu.edu/ktk2. Tweet her at @chutneypower.  

Sarah Fox 

Sarah Fox is a PhD candidate working in the Tactile and Tactical (TAT) Design Lab at the University of Washington, where she conducts a broad range of research at the intersection of design intervention and inquiry. She holds a Master's degree in Digital Media from the Georgia Institute of Technology, where she was a part of the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing. She has worked with the Human Experience and Design group at Microsoft Research and the Interaction and Experience Research group at Intel Labs.
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SUNDAY | 11:30 aM - 12:30 PM 

// Michigan League, Room D (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

DIALOGUE SESSION 2:
FTN DOCC PRIVACY AND TRANSPARENCY IN THE NETWORK

As part of the Operation committee's ongoing discussion about the tensions between privacy and transparency in FemTechNet, we are looking for your opinions!  Please join this Dialogue Session to reflect on these issues and help the Operations committee, who are looking to build an understanding about how people in the Network feel about the ways that we deal with privacy and transparency in the Network.
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Ashley Walker

Ashley Walker is a PhD student in the Media, Technology and Society program at Northwestern University. She has been involved as a senior project manager with FemTechNet for the last two and a half years. Her interests include group privacy norms, technological infrastructure, and the social media ecosystem.
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SUNDAY | 11:30 aM - 12:30 PM 

// Michigan LeagueRoom C (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

DIALOGUE SESSION 3:
FTN DOCC STATEMENTS OF SOLIDARITY

This session takes up the question of when and why FemTechNet should issue statements of solidarity, support, protest, etc. That is, for what reasons, and on what topics, do we see ourselves called, as a network, to speak out? We have not made a habit of issuing statements in the past, but perhaps should? Would you like to see FTN circulate a statement on a particular issue right now?
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Alexandra Juhasz

Alexandra Juhasz is Professor of Media Studies at Pitzer College. She makes and studies committed media practices that contribute to political change and individual and community growth: http://pzacad.pitzer.edu/~ajuhasz. Her current work is on and about feminist Internet culture including YouTube (https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/learning-youtube-0) and feminist pedagogy and community (www.feministonlinespaces.com). With Anne Balsamo, she was founding co-facilitator of FemTechNet.  

Jasmine Rault

Jasmine Rault is one of the FemTechNet co-facilitators this year. She works at the New School in New York City, where she teaches feminist, queer, anti-racist activist and intellectual histories in the department of Culture and Media studies. She is working on a book project, tentatively entitled, Unsettling Affects: Transnational Mediations of Feminist and Queer Activism, and a co-authored book with T.L. Cowan, Checking In: Feminist Labor in Networked Economies.
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SUNDAY | 11:30 aM - 12:30 PM 

// Michigan League,Henderson Room  (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

DIALOGUE SESSION 4:
FTN DOCC VIDEO DIALOGUES & THEMES

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Marla Jaksch

Dr. Marla Jaksch is an associate professor in the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department, with affiliate appointments in the African American Studies Department and the International Studies Program's Africa concentration at The College of New Jersey. Her research interests include neocolonialism, development, and digital cultures; science and technology studies in sub-Saharan Africa; and transnational feminisms and digital media.
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