Educator

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Stories for Understanding Social Media Violence

Paths is a short graphic story written by Mikki Kendall, drawn by her husband Patrick, and colored by kid #1 who also did the lettering and some QC on dialogue, with the help of kid #2 who weighed in with the 4th grade perspective. Paths is free to download, This is a project almost a year in the making, done in partnership with the Center For Solutions to Online Violence. It’s not intended to be a response to all possible forms of online violence, just a way to help parents, teachers, and kids think about why this issue matters and its potential impact. Some other resources for information and support include the following:

Please download, share, and discuss this with the kids and adults in your life. Content warning: references suicide

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Tools for Understanding Social Media Violence

Research Ethics for Social Media In the Classroom DOWNLOADABLE PDF

The Research Ethics for Social Media in the Classroom handout was created by the Digital Alchemists and collaborators and produced by CSOV. The supplementary materials, including the social media ethics videos (coming soon!), were produced by CSOV and coordinated by T.L. Cowan and Moya Bailey.

Power and Control Wheel and Respect wheel for Online engagement
DOWNLOADABLE B&W PDF | DOWNLOADABLE COLOR PDF

The Digital Alchemist created two powerful graphic tools, The Respect Wheel and The Power and Control Wheel, to help people understand the dynamics of social media violence. Inspired by the Power and Control Wheels used in domestic violence settings, the Power and Control wheel details different kinds of online violence. The Respect wheel details the kinds of questions we should all be asking ourselves when using social media content or engaging social media users.

Control-colorThe Respect Wheel

In addition to the graphic pages, Digital Alchemy and CSOV produced a downloadable Power & Respect Handout with both the wheels and a narrative discussion of the issues of power, control, and respect online.

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Research Ethics, Social Media & Accountability Video Series

In June and August of 2016, CSOV and FemTechNet hosted two online Kitchen Table Workshops on the topic of Research Ethics, Social Media and Accountability. Six of the co-facilitators of these workshops further contributed to the project by making videos, responding to the question, Why is it important for teachers, students and journalists to think about Research Ethics when they are using social media as part of their teaching and research?

Alexandrina Agloro, Center For Solutions to Online Violence – Research Ethics and Social Media from FemTechNet on Vimeo.

Dorothy Kim, Center For Solutions to Online Violence – Research Ethics and Social Media from FemTechNet on Vimeo.

Izetta Autumn Mobley, Center For Solutions to Online Violence – Research Ethics and Social Media from FemTechNet on Vimeo.

Joss Greene, Center For Solutions to Online Violence – Research Ethics and Social Media from FemTechNet on Vimeo.

micha cárdenas, Center For Solutions to Online Violence – Research Ethics and Social Media from FemTechNet on Vimeo.

Veronica Paredes, Center For Solutions to Online Violence – Research Ethics and Social Media from FemTechNet on Vimeo.

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Suggested Assignment For Learning How to use CSOV Resources

In groups of 2 or 3, students study the material on one or more of the CSOV pages and present a report to the class on the materials they have found. This will allow the class to navigate the site together. If you want, as a class you can leave a comment on our Students and Other User Responses page!

Assignment Prep Note 4 Teachers: You’ll want to spend a few hours on the site yourself and divide up the materials in a way that makes sense. Some of the pages are mostly made up of links to resources we have collected so they are *very dense*!

Some questions for the class as a whole to discuss:

1. What are some examples of online violence?
2. What are some of the risks of being online and participating in social media sites? 
3. What are some of the ways that you can limit your risk and protect your materials and identities?
4. Where are some places I can go for more information? 
5. As a student, what are some ways that I can make sure that my own social media practices and/or research are not creating harm or reproducing harmful relations of power and control? 
6. What does respect and accountability mean in the context of online communities and social media participation and research? 
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Learn More for in the Classroom

Take Back the Tech’s How To Help guide.

Online Harassment, What Drives It and How It Lowers Visons

What is Doxing and How it is Done (GoHacking)

Online Harassment Resource (International Game Developers Association)

DIY Guide to Feminist Cybersecurity (safehubCollective)

GenderIt.org: Feminist Reflection on Internet Policies

Protecting Kids Online (Federal Trade Commission)

Consumer Resources for Educating Children on Online Safety (Federal Trade Commission)

On Cyberbulling (Federal Trade Commission)

Cybersecurity Resource Guide (Stop.Think.Connect Resource Guide)

Making Safer Choices Online (NSTeens.org)

Educating Peers About Online Violence and Digital Harassment

What is Doxing and How it is Done (GoHacking)

Online Harassment Resource (International Game Developers Association)

DIY Guide to Feminist Cybersecurity (safehubCollective)

What does Online Violence Look Like?

Tumblr Artist’s Experiences with Voyeuristic, Harassing Anonymous Asks (Buzzfeed)

#notyoursneverwas (livers)

Conferences and Harassment

Anti-Harassment Policy Writing for Conference (Ada Initiative)

Code of Conduct for Conferences (DEF CON)

Stanford University on Anti-Harassment Policy for Conferences

Code of Conduct (Digital Library Federation)

A Support Network Creating Safe Spaces at Conferences

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