Search Results for: wiki storming

feminist wiki-storming

Why Teach with Wikipedia?

There are a number of ways that having students work on Wikipedia pages as part of a class can support educational goals. It offers a chance for research and writing to be experienced as a collaborative enterprise as well as an individual activity. It deepens students’ understanding of social media, and it helps them to become more critical thinkers as they engage with the Wikipedia community and its evolving values. It offers them a chance to be an active part of knowledge dissemination and the ongoing public conversation over what constitutes knowledge. Perhaps most crucially, it allows students to take the research and writing process all the way to the publication stage, something that is not normally possible within a single quarter or semester. The awareness that their pages will be visible to a worldwide audience—and that their entries are likely to be critiqued in various ways by the Wikipedia community of editors— tends to raise the bar for student achievement. To date, Wikipedia editing has been successfully integrated into a wide range of fields, from English to Science & Technology Studies to Art.

 

What can Teaching with Wikipedia Offer Classes about Feminism?

Feminists Engage Wikipedia LogoFaculty teaching courses about feminism, or that touch on feminist issues, find that having students engage with Wikipedia can develop their critical awareness in several ways. Fruitful discussions of gender bias (as well as other forms of bias) can develop from close analysis of Wikipedia entries, subject areas, and taxonomies, as well as patterns of language use and social interaction on the site. Students who take the responsibility to create or edit Wikipedia pages where shortcomings have been identified make the crucial step from observer to shaper of the public discourse.

 

What Kinds of Wikipedia Assignments are There?

One common approach is to have students add missing items to Wikipedia, such as biographies of notable women or topical entries related to gender or feminism in some way. While we see the need for traditional Wikipedia assignments that focus on adding such content to Wikipedia, we also want to encourage professors to develop assignments that encourage students to learn about the processes on Wikipedia that are responsible for perpetuating some of the gender bias inherent in traditional encyclopedias and culture at large. Please see below for approaches to creating assignments and links to existing assignment examples.

 

Wikistorming Learning Objectives

In summary, among the possible learning objectives for Wikistorming assignments and projects are the following:

  • Students learn to write for diverse, global audiences
  • Students learn information literacy for the digital age
  • Students develop the research and writing skills to contribute to the world’s largest encyclopedia
  • Students contribute to the effort to create a more equitable, inviting knowledge-space
  • Students learn about how knowledge is produced and consumed, becoming better critical thinkers
  • Students become an integral part of a knowledge-building community
  • Students learn about engaging in principled intellectual discussion in the public sphere
  • Students gain skills in collaborative writing

 

Approaches to Teaching with Wikipedia

There are a plethora of ways that one might teach with Wikipedia. Below are a couple of starting points, which are by no means exhaustive. We have offered more details on kinds of assignments that the Wikistorming Committee has discussed or that have been taught by other FemTechNet members in the Sample Wikipedia Assignments page.

  • Developing critical readings and understanding the topics/issues/people for which Wikipedia articles exist   While Wikipedia is much larger than any previous encyclopedia because it is not limited by the printed page, not every topic has an article and many are excluded. Wikipedia has a “notability” threshold that topics must reach to be included. Understanding the complex criteria that make up this policy and the debates that surround it is a key part of understanding Wikipedia.
  • Identifying areas for new article creation or article expansion  Once students have a sense of the notability threshold, they can identify areas in which to propose new articles or expand existing content. This process might also include discussions of what doesn’t rise to the level of notable and a critical appraisal of how that impacts content and what kinds of dependencies within the resource are thereby suggested.
  • Survey existing debates to understand how the editorial community works  The editorial community of Wikipedia consists of many different kinds of editors and there are robust conversations regarding the structure, processes, and content of Wikipedia. Introduce students to the concept of the “Talk Page” and then encourage them to learn from discussions and participate.
  • Participate in the content creation  One of the best ways to understand how Wikipedia works is to participate in content creation. This can range from small scale editing to the creation of articles or projects. See the sample assignments for ideas on how to get started.
  • Participate in the peer review process  Wikipedia depends not only on the work of editors for content creation, but also for peer review of existing articles and support of other editors. Students can join in this critical review process.

 

Creating Assignments

There are a number of ways to approach developing assignments and events for Wikistorming efforts. Whatever you choose, we recommend that you consult someone who has done such an assignment or event before and/or poke around on Wikipedia yourself so that you have a good sense of the possible areas of confusion and pitfalls. The Wikipedia Education Program has Campus Ambassadors and Online Ambassadors that can help you with your classes and Wikipedia:GLAM can help you if you are working on events with cultural institutions. Please also see more information on Types of Wikipedia Work from FemTechNet.

Example of Five Wikistorming Projects

For the Fall of 2013, DOCC professors and students worked on the following five projects:

  • Adding feminist scholarship to already existing content on Wikipedia
  • Creating and expanding articles on women who played and are playing important roles in history and current events
  • Making Wikipedia readers and editors more aware of the systemic gender bias inherent in the encyclopedia’s structure
  • Encouraging feminists, academics, and activists to contribute to Wikipedia and help revolutionize its culture
  • Participating in Wikipedia’s processes

By adding articles and information about women and feminist scholarship, we are making certain women and their contributions to culture are remembered and acknowledged in the digital landscape. By becoming contributors to Wikipedia, we are helping change the demographics of Wikipedia’s editor-base in order to create a more equitable, inviting space.  These projects emphasize the collaborative nature of both Wikipedia and feminist projects – they do not have to be ones in which a professor dictates all of the rules and then gives a grade. We want to encourage professors and students to learn together, contribute together, and become part of the larger Wikipedia community. As such, we have created a hub of activity at WikiProject Feminism on Wikipedia, an open tasks list, that lists article related to these goals very broadly. If you are looking for areas to contribute, this is a good place to start.

Sample assignments developed by instructors who are already working with Wikipedia in their classes are linked below.

 

Resources

From Members of FemTechNet:

Essential Wikipedia Resources:

From the FemTechNet Vimeo Channel:

Wikistorming in Progress

By Adrianne Wadewitz

For the past two months, students in DOCC’s Wikistorming projects have been contributing information on women and feminism to Wikipedia, bringing their voices to the larger cultural conversation about what it means to write about underrepresented topics.

  • At The New School, students have added content to a variety of articles about women and topics which had previously undeveloped articles. For example, one student is researching the Soviet filmmaker Esfir Shub. As the student writes, she “was an incredibly influential pioneering documentary filmmaker and editor in post-revolutionary Soviet Russia…Her best known film, Fall of the Romanov Dynasty, was the first Soviet documentary to employ sound. I am thrilled to a part of this course as delves into the depths of my interests. It has been an interesting experience thus far.” Another student is expanding the article on Brenda Laurel, who is, as the student explains, “known for her involvement and enthusiasm for female gaming and was the vice-president and founder of Purple Moon, a gaming company that was dedicated to creating games for young girls.”

WikiEditingGSLISOct2013

University of Illinois Students editing Wikipedia, October 2013

  • At the University Illinois, students have made plans to improve a wide variety of articles related to women, from comedian Tig Notaro to vegetarian food writer Deborah Madison to Betty Crocker. All of these articles are in serious need of improvement and the students’ work will dramatically improve their visibility and completeness.
  • At the Claremont Colleges, students have organized a Wikipedia edit-a-thon to be held Friday December 6th in conjunction with students from Cal State Fullerton and Cal State San Luis Obispo, where they will share their expertise and editing knowledge, followed by a collegial dinner. While FemTechNet aims to show the possibilities of distributed efforts of online communities through its DOCC, it does not neglect the importance of the physical presence and rejoices in the connections that can be made in these physical spaces.

While a great deal of work was completed, there is more to do. See our lists of open tasks at WikiProject Feminism to help out!

The Eye of the Wikistorm

By Jade Ulrich, Pitzer College

On Monday, December 2, a fellow FemTechNet (FTN) intern, Susie Ferrell, and I organized an event with funding that we were awarded from the Reclaim Open Learning Contest last summer. FemTechNet is an activated network of scholars, artists, and students who work on, with, and at the borders of technology, science and feminism in a variety of fields including STS, Media and Visual Studies, Art, Women’s Queer, and Ethnic Studies. Participants in the Feminist Dialogues on Technology course at Pitzer College, along with other interested students from the Claremont Colleges community, came together for this three-part event.

PitzerWikiStormStudents

Entitled “The Eye of the Wikistorm: The Future of Feminist Technoculture Histories,” we hosted a moderated discussion between Dr. Adrianne Wadewitz (Occidental College) and Professor Jacqueline Wernimont (Scripps College), to create a dialogue on the keyword, “WikiStorm.” We filmed the hour-long discussion between our two guests. I asked them how they see traditional academic work intersecting with public intellectual labor (such as Wikipedia), and then asked them to share their recent Wikipedia-related projects. To hear their answers, you will have to watch the WikiStorm Dialogue video, which will be up on the Commons as soon as it is edited!

WikiStormScrippsPitzerWikiStormStudents2

Following this filmed dialogue, those in attendance embarked on their own Wiki-a-thon. The Wikistorming project seeks to engender a set of digital practices among women and girls, to teach and encourage their participation in writing the techno-cultural histories of the future by becoming active participants in the creation of global digital archives. Experienced Wikipedians helped the new editors, and great work was done on this digital encyclopedia. At the end of the evening, we all enjoyed a delicious Thai dinner, where we socialized and talked about why we were attending the event. Many of us had similar interests, and the conversation flowed easily. In the end, FemTechNet brought together a group of passionate people, filmed a dialogue video that we can add to the FTN archive for future use, and we enjoyed each other’s company throughout an evening of Feminist Technology Networking. What more could we ask for?

 

online open office hours 2014-2015

DOCC 2014: September – December

Collaborations in Feminist & Technology  

Video Dialogues & Online Open Office Hours Schedule

Each week from Sept 22-Dec 1st we will feature a Video Dialogue on the FemTechNet website and host an Online Open Office Hour (OOOH) for anyone involved or interested in FemTechNet to join. The OOOH times differ from week to week, so please take note of these dates and times.

There is a Town Hall Meeting scheduled for Nov 25 on the topic of Feminist Digital Media Praxis and Safety/Risk. A second Town Hall on the topic of  International Feminist Collaborations is scheduled for Dec 15/16.

Unless otherwise stated, we will host the OOOH and Town Hall Meetings on Bluejeans. All OOOH and Town Hall links will be posted to the FemTechNet website.

Questions?

Contact the course director: T.L. Cowan, Chair, Pedagogy Committee, FemTechNet (cowant AT newschool.edu)

September 26, 2014

Wk 1: History of the Engagement of Feminism, Technology and Issues of Women’s Labor

Judy Wajcman interviewed by Anne Balsamo. See video here.

Office Hour Discussion led by: Elizabeth Losh and Melissa Gregg

Date/Time: Friday September 26 1-2PM PST (4-5PM EST)

Open Source Reading(s):

  1. “Families without Borders: Mobile Phones, Connectedness, and Work-Home Divisions” by Judy Wajcman, Michael Bittman, and Judith Brown http://www.lse.ac.uk/sociology/pdf/Wajcman%20Families%20Without%20Borders.pdf
  2. “Circuits of Labor: A Labor Theory of the iPhone Era” by Jack Linchuan Qiu, Melissa Gregg, and Kate Crawford  https://www.academia.edu/7268238/Circuits_of_Labor_A_Labor_Theory_of_the_iPhone_Era
  3. “Introduction” to Digital Labor: The Internet as Playground and Factory by Trebor Scholz https://www.academia.edu/2303176/Introduction_to_Digital_Labor_The_Internet_as_Playground_and_Factory

September 30, 2014
Wk 2:  Archive

Discussion with Lynn Hershman and B. Ruby Rich moderated by Anne Balsamo. See video here.

Office Hour Discussion led by: Veronica Paredes

Date/Time: Tuesday September 30 | 4:00 pm ET/ 3:00 pm CT / 1:00 pm PT

Readings:

    1. Lynn Hershman Leeson, RAW/WAR: Revolution Art Women project | Teknolust trailer (2002) | Documentation archive of Lynn Hershman Leeson’s artwork !Women Art Revolution (2010) available to view here on Hulu (requires a login)
    2. B. Ruby Rich “In the Name of Feminist Film Criticism” Heresies, no. 9 (Vol. 3, No. 1, 1980): 74-81. (Searchable version of Rich’s piece can be found here – pw: ftn!2014
    3. Kate Eichhorn, “Archiving the Movement: The Riot Grrrl Collection at Fales Library and Special Collections.” In Documenting Feminist Activism. Eds.Kelly Wooten and Liz Bly. LA: Litwin Books, 2012.

October 7, 2014
Wk 3:  Feminism, Technology, and Wiki Storming

Discussion with Jacqueline Wernimont and Adrianne Wadewitz moderated by Jade Ulrich. See video here.

Office Hour Discussion led by: Jacqueline Wernimont

Date/Time: Tuesday, Oct 7 11-12 ET: 9-10 MT; 8-9 PT

Readings:

  1. Wadewitz, Adrianne “Looking at the five pillars of Wikipedia as a feminist” Part 1 and 2
  2. Sentiles, Sarah. “Writing Her In: Wikipedia as Feminist Activism” Ms. Blog, May 21, 2014

October 16, 2014
Wk 4:  Feminism, Technology and Sexualities

Discussion with Julie Levin Russo and Faith Wilding moderated by Anne Balsamo. See video here.

Office Hour Discussion led by: María González Aguado

Date/Time: Thursday Oct. 16th from 1-2 pm EST

Meeting link:  https://bluejeans.com/669641108

Readings:

  1. Manderson, Lenore (2012): Material Worlds, Sexy Lives, in in Manderson, Lenore: Technologies of Sexuality, Identity and Sexual Health”, Routledge. file:///Users/maria/Downloads/Material_worlds__sexy_lives-libre.pdf
  2. Traweek, Sharon (2000): “Warning Signs: Acting on Images”, in “Revisioning Women, Health, and Healing. Feminist, Cultural, and Technoscience Perspectives”, edited by A. Clark and Virginia Olesen: http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/history/traweek/Warning.pdf
  3. Wittig, Monique: One is Not a Woman http://research.uvu.edu/albrecht-crane/2600/links_files/Wittig.pdf 

Suggested reading: Buchanan, Holly, Rei, Frank & Couch, Murray (2012): “The Re/Making of Men and Penile Modification”; in Manderson, Lenore: Technologies of Sexuality, Identity and Sexual Health”, Routledge. (Please email mariagaguadoATgmailDOTcom to get the pdf)

(For readings on the topic in Spanish, please, contact mariagaguadoATgmailDOTcom)

October 20, 2014
Wk 5:  Feminism, Technology and Race

To discuss VIDEO DIALOGUE with Lisa Nakamura and Maria Fernandez, moderated by Anne Balsamo. See video here.

Office Hour Discussion led by: Lisa Nakamura and Veronica Paredes

Date/Time: Monday October 20 | 11:00am-12:00pm ET (8:00-9:00am PT/ 10:00-11:00am CT)

Meeting link:  https://bluejeans.com/669641108

Readings:

  1. Lisa Nakamura, “Queer Female of Color: The Highest Difficulty Setting There Is? Gaming Rhetoric as Gender Capital,”  Ada: a Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology, No. 1. 2012
  2. Lisa Nakamura, “Cyber-race,” PMLA: Proceedings of the Modern Language Association, Special issue on Comparative Racialization, 2008
  3. María Fernandez, “Cyberfeminism, Racism, Embodiment,” Domain Errors: Cyberfeminist Practices!, Maria Fernandez, Faith Wilding, Michelle M. Wright, eds (New York: Autonomedia 2002).

 YouTube videos:

  1. chescaleigh, “Just Stop Talking About Race!!”
  2. Jay Smooth, “How To Tell Someone They Sound Racist”
  3. Aamer Rahman (Fear of a Brown Planet) – Reverse Racism

October 28, 2014
Week 6: Bodies

Discussion featuring Alondra Nelson and Jessie Daniels with Lisa Nakamura and Sidonie Smith. See video here.

 Office Hour Discussion led by: T.L. Cowan

Date/Time: Mon Oct. 27 7-8pm ET Changed to Tuesday 3pmET

Meeting link:  https://bluejeans.com/669641108

Readings:

  1. Alondra Nelson. “The Social Life of DNA.” Chronicle of Higher Education. 29 Aug. 2010. http://chronicle.com/article/The-Social-Life-of-DNA/124138/
  2. Jessie Daniels. “Web 2.0, Healthcare Policy and Community Health Activism.” Policy and Politics for Nurses and Other Health Professionals. Eds. Donna M. Nikitas, et. al. Sudbury MA: Jones and Bartlett (2011): 277-285.  https://www.academia.edu/6820282/Case_Study_Web_2.0_Healthcare_Policy_and_Community_Health_Activism

Making Bodies

Discussion with Skawennati and Heather Cassils moderated by T.L. Cowan. See video here.

Office Hour Discussion led by: T.L. Cowan and K. Surkan

Date/Time: Tuesday Oct. 28 3-4pm ET

Meeting link:  https://bluejeans.com/669641108

Readings: 

  1. Christine L. Liao, “My Metamorphic Avatar Journey.” Visual Culture & Gender. 3 (2008). http://vcg.emitto.net/3vol/liao.pdf
  2. Henry Jenkins. “It’s 2012. Do You Know Where Your Avatar Is?”: An Interview with Beth Coleman.

Watch artist talks brought to you by FemTechNet:

 Bodies 2013 at Illinois

Discussion featuring video dialogue with Dorothy Roberts and Karen Flynn moderated by Sharon Irish.

Office Hour Discussion led by: Sharon Irish, combined with TL Cowan and K Surkan, above

Date/Time: Wed. Oct 29, 4-5pm EST

November 4, 2014

Wk 7:  Difference

Discussion with Shu Lea Cheang and Kim Sawchuk moderated by Sara DiamondSee video here.

Office Hour Discussion led by: Karen Keifer-Boyd

Date/Time: Tues. Nov. 4, 3-5 pm EST

How to join via Adobe Connect:

Participants to this OOOH will be joining Karen Keifer-Boyd’s class discussion and already should have viewed the FTN Difference video dialogue. Go to https://meeting.psu.edu/oooh_difference/ (Adobe Connect Penn State, no sign-in or download needed. Go to the URL and turn on your mic when speaking, and mute while others are speaking. The webcam will be enabled to see each other, and we’ll use screen share when we watch Dr. Ordóñez’s class recording of their response to FemTechNet’s “Difference” Video Dialogue and then back to viewing the seminar table with students in the class to discuss with all joining us. The Penn State students will be preparing their performative research videos in response to the FTN Difference video dialogue and present this on Nov. 11. There are 7 graduate students in the course, Including Difference. Refer to Nov. 4 details at http://cyberhouse.arted.psu.edu/difference/topics/11_subjectivity.html for links and other details during the OOOH discussion.

Readings:

  1. Nyman, Micki (2013). Interpretation makes it real: Disability and subjectivity in biopics of three women artists. Disability Studies Quarterly, 33(4). Retrieved from http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/1777/3259

Suggested Readings (students in the class will have read these on Sept. 23 for the class they watched the FTN Difference video dialogue):

November 10, 2014
Wk 8:  Place
Discussion with Radhika Gajjala and Sharon Irish moderated by Alex Juhasz. See video here.

Office Hour Discussion led by: Cricket Keating & Melissa Meade

Date/Time: Monday, Nov. 10, 12-1 pm EST

Meeting link:  https://bluejeans.com/669641108

Readings:

  1. Doreen Massey, “A Global Sense of Place,” Marxism Today 38(1991), 24-29. http://thinkurbanism.wordpress.com/2011/12/15/a-global-sense-of-place-by-doreen-massey-1991/
  2. Brenda Nyandiko Sanya, “Disrupting patriarchy: An examination of the role of e-technologies in rural Kenya.” Feminist Africa 18(2013), 12-24.

November 17 & 21, 2014
Wk 9: Systems

Discussion with Lucy Suchman and Katherine Gibson Graham moderated by Anne Balsamo. See video here.

Office Hour Discussion led by: Alex Cruse

Date/Time: Monday, Nov 17 (2:00pm EST)

Meeting link:  https://bluejeans.com/669641108

Readings: “Systems Theory and the Spirit of Feminism: Grounds for a Connection,” Barbara Hanson, pgs. 1-11, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sres.412/pdf (subject to change)

Systems: Games
Discussion with Brenda Laurel and Janet Murray moderated by Anne Balsamo. See video here.

Office Hour Discussion led by: Sandra Gabriele & Mia Consalvo

Date/Time: Friday November 21 at 13h00 (1pm EST)

Register by sending email to cowant AT newschool.edu: subject line – Games. Please write a 1 or 2-sentence description of why you want to participate.

On the date of the event, you will get an email with an invitation to join the online discussion via BlueJeans. When you first work in BlueJeans you will need to install a plugin, which happens almost automatically when you follow the invitation directions.

Readings:

  1. Consalvo, M. (2012). Confronting Toxic Gamer Culture: A Challenge for Feminist Game Studies Scholars. Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology, No. 1. http://adanewmedia.org/2012/11/issue1-consalvo/
  2. “Television Interview about Harassment in Gaming.” Feminist Frequency. November 3, 2012. http://www.feministfrequency.com/2012/11/television-interview-about-harassment-in-gaming/ 

Suggested Readings:

November 24, 2014
Wk 10:  Performance has been CANCELLED; stay tuned for early 2015

Bilingual (Spanish & English) discussion with Maris Bustamante and Sara Diamond, moderated by Maria-Belén Ordóñez and Paula Gardner. (Video link TBA)

Office Hour Discussion led by: Maria-Belén Ordóñez

Date/Time: Monday, Nov 24 10:30-11:30 a.m (EST)

Readings:

  1. Anzaldua, Gloria “La Conciencia de la Mestiza: Towards a New Consciousness”  in Borderlands La Frontera: The New Mestiza San Francisco: AuteLute Books, 1999. http://faculty.oxy.edu/ron/msi/05/texts/anzaldua-mestizaconsciousness.pdf
  2. Frieze: No-Grupo http://www.frieze.com/issue/review/no-grupo/

December 1, 2014
Wk 11:  Transformations

Discussion about the work of Beatriz da Costa featuring Donna Haraway and Catherine Lord moderated by Alex Juhasz. See video here.

Transformations, pt II

Part II features the live question and answer session following the presentations from Donna Haraway and Catherine Lord about Beatriz da Costa’s work, moderated by Alex Juhasz.

Office Hours for both videos led by: Alexandra Juhasz

Date/Time: Monday, December 1, 1PM PST

Meeting link:  https://bluejeans.com/669641108

Readings: http://scalar.usc.edu/anvc/feminist-anti-mooc/instructions

The link above is an interactive reader that is available free online and is comprised of these three readings:

  1. Donna Haraway, “Science, Technology, and Socialist-Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century,” in Simians, Cyborgs and Women: The Reinvention of Nature (New York; Routledge, 1991), pp.149-181.
  2. Beatriz da Costa,  “Reaching the Limit When Art Becomes Science,” in Tactical Biopolitics: Art, Activism, and Technoscience, eds. da Costa and Kavita Phillips (MIT Press, 2010).
  3. Catherine Lord, Summer of Her Baldness, (University of TX Press, 2004).

 

key learning projects

Since the launch of Distributed Open Collaborative Courses in 2013, many FemTechNet participants have developed Key Learning Projects in collaboration across the network. New activities are in development too, but you may check out those that have been developed so far:

What is a Key Learning Project? Our intention is that these projects will have the most support from the FemTechNet Pedagogy Committee, and therefore will be easiest to access and easiest to collaborate around across nodal sites. Like everything in the DOCC 2013, these are buy-in: instructors will use them in their courses if and as best suits their students and learning objectives.

For examples of student projects in response to these and other assignments during the Beta classes and DOCC 2013, please see the Student Projects Gallery.

What about other Projects/Assignments? Any instructor can assign her/his/their own projects at any time.

Examples of Other Projects/Assignments

Annotated Readers: In the Spring 2013 Beta class, undergrad students at Pitzer and grad students in a digital pedagogies seminar at USC participated in two collaborative projects where the grad students produced annotated digital readers for undergrads, around the course themes Transformation (reading by Haraway, Lord, and da Costa) and Race (readings by Nakamura and Fernandez), using two authoring tools, Comment Press and Scalar.

Making: AJ Strout, Pitzer Beta Class, created a detailed record and a blog of the many in-class, hands-on “making” exercises that Pitzer students participated in during the Spring of 2013.

Conference: UCFemTechNet Conference, with UCSD (and other UC) grad student volunteers and day of panels and workshops: http://feministit.ucsd.edu/

Tribute to Adrianne Wadewitz

Written by Alex Juhasz and Anne Balsamo

It is with grief and shock that FemTechNet marks the untimely death of our remarkable collaborator and colleague, Dr. Adrianne Wadewitz. Within our community of feminist scholars, artists and activists, she was a leader, innovator, and expert. Her work for FemTechNet, collaborating with other instructors and students on our Wikistorming Committee, had deep impact for our community, and will have lasting effect as feminists around the world continue to follow her lead as they add feminist voices, influences, histories, and theories into Wikipedia.

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presenters

presenters

 

Friday | 2:10 PM - 3:00 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

INTRODUCTION TO FEMTECHNET’S DOCC & CONFERENCE OVERVIEW

Welcome to the Conference 
by Lisa Nakamura

Introduction to the Conference and DOCC Pedagogical Experiments
by Karen Keifer-Boyd

DOCC Wikistorming
by Veronica Paredes

FemTechNet Hactivism
by Karl Surkan

FemTechNet signal/noise
by T.L. Cowan

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Lisa Nakamura

Lisa Nakamura is the Gwendolyn Calvert Baker Collegiate Professor of American Cultures at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  She is the Coordinator of the Digital Studies Program at the University of Michigan and a proud former co-Faciliator of FemTechNet.  She has been researching racism, sexism, the Internet, and gaming since 1995 and her books and open-access shorter pieces are available at lisanakamura.net.   Tweet her at @lnakamur.  

Karen Keifer-Boyd

Karen Keifer-Boyd is professor of art education and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Penn State. Her website is http://www.personal.psu.edu/ktk2. Tweet her at @chutneypower.  

Marla Jaksch

Dr. Marla Jaksch is an associate professor in the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department, with affiliate appointments in the African American Studies Department and the International Studies Program's Africa concentration at The College of New Jersey. Her research interests include neocolonialism, development, and digital cultures; science and technology studies in sub-Saharan Africa; and transnational feminisms and digital media.   

Veronica Paredes

Veronica Paredes is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Media and Cinema Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she is also affiliated with the Culture and Society thematic area at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). She is a 2015-2016 FemTechNet co-facilitator, along with Anne Cong-Huyen, T.L. Cowan, Paula Gardner and Jasmine Rault. She co-chairs the collective’s Tech Praxis and Wikipedia working groups and is an active member of the Critical Race and Ethnic Studies Committee.  

Karl Surkan

Karl Surkan has been teaching in the Program in Women's and Gender Studies at MIT for the past 11 years and loves to try out new pedagogical experiments! His research interests include new media activism and online social movements, feminist media studies, technology studies, queer/trans politics and representation, reproductive technologies, and most recently wearable technologies and epatient communities and health activism.  

T.L. Cowan

T.L. Cowan is a writer, performer, activist and professor whose work focuses on the cultural and intellectual economies and social lives of trans- feminist and queer media & performance, and on contemporary digital cultures, labour, affect, politics and pedagogies. T.L. is the 2015-2016 Bicentennial Canadian Visiting Lecturer at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies and Digital Humanities Fellow at Yale University. T.L. is currently a co-facilitator of the Feminist Technology Network (part of the #F5 co-facilitator collective). T.L.'s website is tlcowan.net and twitter handle is @AgingSupermodel.  
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Friday | 3:15 PM - 4:15 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

Porcus Oeconomicus: Labor, Feminism and Biopolitics of the Smithfield Pig

This paper will look at how social media and feminist performance art can be employed to understand the patriarchal and biopolitical effects created by Smithfield pigs (for both human and nonhuman populations), who seemingly have zero agency in these confined environments and are genetically formulated to be the perfect homo oecomonicus. 
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Lindsay Garcia

Lindsay Garcia is an artist and second year PhD student in American Studies at the College of William and Mary with a specialization in political art, art history, activism, the built environment, and animal studies. Garcia holds a BFA in Sculpture from Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), an MA in Contemporary Art from Sotheby’s Institute of Art, an MFA in Visual Art from SUNY Purchase, and an MA in American Studies from the College of William and Mary.
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Friday | 3:15 PM - 4:15 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

Build, Buy, or Modernize: Mechanization of America’s Kitchen 1900-1959

Culminating in the 1959 Kitchen Debate between Nixon and Khrushchev at the American National Exhibition in Moscow through exchanges on political ideologies and questions of progress, affordability, and efficiency, this paper engages in the discourse of the kitchen and its role in defining public and private life, traditional and modern practices in an increasingly urbanized and industrialized society. 
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Khanh Vo

Khanh Vo is a second year MA/PhD student in the American Studies Program at the College of William and Mary. Vo's research interests are in 19th and 20th century American history, material culture, social history of science and technology, gender studies in concert with questions of labor, and food studies.
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Friday | 3:15 PM - 4:15 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

ARRAYPROJECT&&

Our presentation will briefly present our motivations, step through the front and back of ArrayProject for context,and present some of the research finding generated through the monthly listerv themes.

Array Project Website

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JESSICA PARRIS WESTBROOK & ADAM TROWBRIDGE

Jessica Westbrook is an Associate Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Westbrook collaborates with Adam Trowbridge as Channel TWo (CH2), an award winning new media studio. CH2 has published, exhibited, and screened their art and design work nationally and internationally.
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Friday | 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Building the Feminist Cyborg Collective

How can we create accessible, inclusive and diverse communities? It is not enough to allow, it is not enough to invite, an inclusive space and culture must actively be dug out and constructed. This is community building in Makerspaces through a cyborg lens.
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Lindy Wilkins

Lindy Wilkins is a feminist cyborg and Maker currently based in Toronto. As co-founder of Make Friends TO, Community Technologist at STEAMLabs, and Director at Site 3 coLaboratory, Lindy’s work centres around inclusivity and diversity in technology based DIY organizations. They hold an MFA from OCAD University, as well as a BFA from Concordia University. Between adventures in collaborative exploration, Lindy spends their time cycling, building whimsical robots, and being a general enthusiast.
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Friday | 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Wind Her Up; Watch Her Dance: The Mechanization of the Hula Girl in Twentieth Century America

This presentation identifies the ways in which mechanized “Hula Girl” toys were one of the first examples of humanoid robots tasked with performing affective labor for millions of Americans. In turn, these “primitive” androids shaped and were shaped by the American imaginary about Pacific Islanders as gendered, raced, commoditized, and objectified.
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Leah M. Kuragano

Leah Kuragano is an an alumna of Bennington College in Vermont and a graduate student in American Studies at the College of William & Mary. Her more recent research interests concern the American Pacific Island imaginary in literature, visual art, and music at the turn of the century and onward.
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Friday | 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Calling to Talk and Listening Well: The Multimedia Practices of Feminist Telephone Hotlines

This presentation will consider some of the challenges and methodological directions for mapping feminist communications systems through archival documents. More specifically, I will present current research from a chapter of the book manuscript I working on, which is a media history of lesbian-feminist information activism from the 1970s to the present.
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Cait McKinney

Cait McKinney is the Media@McGill postdoctoral fellow at McGill University, Montreal, where she also teaches at the Institute for Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies. Cait’s research examines feminist and LGBTQ social movement media infrastructure, emphasizing late 20th-century digital transitions. Recent writing appears in Feminist Theory, the Radical History Review, and No More Potlucks.
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Friday | 5:45 PM - 6:45 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Creativity and Subjectivity in Social Media Activism

Social media activism furthers feminist and intersectional understandings of identity, hybridity, surveillance, and community, and reveals how subjectivity, technology, and creativity are co-constitutive categories.
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Ellen Moll

Ellen Moll specializes in feminist technoscience, digital cultures, intersectionality, diaspora, and contemporary literature by women. She works as teaching faculty and in curriculum development for the College of Arts and Letters at Michigan State University.
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Friday | 5:45 PM - 6:45 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Feminist Advocacy and Privacy Management

This paper expands research surrounding the online practice of doxing, and its possible impacts on feminist discourse, community, and identity.
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Jade Metzger

Jade Metzger is a PhD student in communication studies at Wayne State University. She coaches individual events for WSU’s Speech and Debate Team. She received her BS from Ball State University where she was a speech competitor for three years. Jade’s scholarly interest examines the disclosure of stigmatized identities and the reaction of communities to stigma and individual management of marginalization.  

Stine Eckert

Stine Eckert is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Wayne State University. Her research interests include the intersections of social media, gender and minorities in U.S. and European contexts.
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Friday | 5:45 PM - 6:45 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

  

Bridging with STEAM/M: Engaging Activists, Academics and Creative Industry in Transformative ICT Practice

Gardner discusses her proposed research project, involving FTN, that incorporates critical media and digital theory as well as feminist theory in the development of a STEAM/M approach. This paper demonstrates how key concepts, such as those developed by Suchman (situated learning), Haraway (diffraction) and Barad (interference) usefully crack open new understandings of ICT/M practices that can lead to socially response innovation and creation as well as changes that respect and value womens’ diverse practices in these spaces.
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Paula Gardner

Paula Gardner is Asper Chair in Communications, in the Department of Communication Studies and Multimedia at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Gardner is a critical feminist media scholar who writes about the ambivalent relationships we have with technologies, particularly biometric devices. Her participatory, multimedia research employs digital and biometric devices critically, seeking to render them accessible and transparent, to engage them in socially interventionist practices, and to consider the abetting role of the aesthetic.
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Friday | 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)

  

SIGNAL/NOISE LAUNCH PARTY

Please join the editors of the signal/noise publication, in celebrating the launch of our inaugural issue, and the amazing work being done by faculty, students, and other participants of FemTechNet DOCCs since 2013!
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[ signal/noise editorial collective ]  

T.L. Cowan

T.L. Cowan is a writer, performer, activist and professor whose work focuses on the cultural and intellectual economies and social lives of trans- feminist and queer media & performance, and on contemporary digital cultures, labour, affect, politics and pedagogies. T.L. is the 2015-2016 Bicentennial Canadian Visiting Lecturer at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies and Digital Humanities Fellow at Yale University. T.L. is currently a co-facilitator of the Feminist Technology Network (part of the #F5 co-facilitator collective). T.L.'s website is tlcowan.net and twitter handle is @AgingSupermodel.  

Juliana Luchkiw

Juliana Luchkiw is a hybrid creature, interested in intertwining agential affinities of fiction, theory, and lived experience. Her work evokes specters of deviance and abject beings by relating to memory and trauma, and drawing constellations that echo silenced bodies with text, performativity, video, sound, collage, interactive creatures and an-architecture. printmaking, design, and web-based projects are also a part of her practice. She is a part of nadahada collective, and she has a BA in The Arts from Eugene Lang College and BFA in Communication Design from Parsons School of Design.  

Marcea Decker

Marcea Decker is a graphic designer, illustrator, animator and sometimes lecturer currently based in NYC, where she earned her Master’s of Science from Parsons The New School for Design. Her work and interests are inspired by the transformative power of art, visual communication, and design. On a typical day you can find her playing too many video games, drawing cartoons, and 3D printing both useful & useless pieces of plastic.  

Skylar Maguire

Skylar Maguire is an organizer, filmmaker, drummer, and amateur game designer from Vermont. Currently living and going to school in New York City, they study Media and Culture with double minors in Gender Studies and Global Studies. Now a retired barista, they enjoy life as dog walker, doggie day care attendant, and volunteer cat caretaker– an unpaid position where they attempt to feed and/or befriend the neighborhood strays.  

Pallavi Guha

Pallavi Guha has been a professional journalist and media educator for more than a decade. Pallavi has worked internationally for leading media organizations including BBC News and television in London and The Times of India in India. As a journalist Pallavi reported on politics and education including the social changes in UK during the Blair administration, parliamentary elections in India, winners of Special Olympics among others. Pallavi has been an instructor and teaching assistant; and taught several courses on gender, media and communication. Pallavi has majored in Political Science from Presidency College, Kolkata, India. She has two masters’ degrees, in International Relations from Jadavpur University, Kolkata and Communication from Rutgers University, NJ. She also has an M.Phil degree in International Relations from Jadavpur University, India. Pallavi's research interests include social media communication, gender, politics and media. Pallavi has presented her academic and professional work at national and international conferences. She has published peer reviewed articles and book chapters at the Feminist Media Studies and MIT Press.
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saturday | 10:15 aM - 1:00 PM 

// Hatcher Library Gallery Instruction Lab, North Side (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

WIKISTORMING WORKSHOP

Teaching WIKID GRRLS
A User Experience Approach to the Politics of Information Design

Coordinators of the WIKID GRRLS project, Jade Metzger and Stine Eckert, will provide a workshop on the WIKID GRRLS after school project for researchers, teachers, and school coordinators. The coordinators will talk about the transdisciplinary benefits of implementing the program, including creating alliances across the academic fields and community educators. Coordinators will also discuss the challenges of the program. The workshop provides space for conversations about STEM education with young girls in urbanized areas, closing the gender gap on Wikipedia, and Wikistorming. The second half of the 3 hour wikistorming workshop will be facilitated by Marta Delatte beginning with her presentation of her research on a user experience approach to the politics of information design. After the presentation the group will be invited to be the first testers of an app that it is being developed to improve the exploration experience of underprivileged communities in creative archives such as wikipedia. Two features of the app will be collaboratively tested: knowledge maps and feedback buttons. The whole workshop it is being named “The wishlist” because participants will be able to communicate how they prefer to explore creative archives.

WIKID GRRLS Project Website 

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Marta Delatte

Journalist, digital curator and researcher, Marta Delatte is currently the recipient of a Doctoral Scholarship at the Media and Memory Research Initiative of the University of Hull (UK). All her academic and professional experiences are related to the study of contemporary narratives, digital culture and feminisms.  

Jade Metzger

Jade Metzger is a PhD student in communication studies at Wayne State University. She coaches individual events for WSU’s Speech and Debate Team. She received her BS from Ball State University where she was a speech competitor for three years. Jade’s scholarly interest examines the disclosure of stigmatized identities and the reaction of communities to stigma and individual management of marginalization.  

Stine Eckert

Stine Eckert is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Wayne State University. Her research interests include the intersections of social media, gender and minorities in U.S. and European contexts.
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saturday | 10:15 aM - 1:00 PM 

// Hatcher Library Gallery, North Side (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

EXQUISITE ENGENDERING WORKSHOP

Vibrant Lives DataPlay
Engendering Futures: Speculative Design, Play, Place and the Dreaming Collective 

Erin Manning, in her book, Politics of Touch, describes that “To engender is to undertake a reworking of form. To engender is to potentialize matter. Engendering involves potentiality at its most fertile: it calls forth the link between the incorporeal and the material, between the virtual and the actual” (2007, p. 90). The Exquisite Engendering Workshop begins with Vibrant Lives DataPlay, facilitated by Jacqueline Wernimont, Jessica Rajko, and Eileen Standley of Arizona State University. Participants engage with interactive sculptures developed by the facilitators that use mobile phone data to produce touch-based (haptic) feedback. Infrasonic subwoofers placed within the sculptures produce vibration feedback based on individual and aggregate data packets being sent and received through mobile phones. The data is de-identified and not permanently captured in order to protect privacy and security. This highly interactive session allows for participants to drop-by during the three-hour workshop to “play” as both recreation and performance. Vibrant Live DataPlay encourages participants to touch, hold, and play with both personal and collective data. In the second half of the workshop, Ash Eliza Smith presents Engendering Futures: Speculative Design, Play, Place and the Dreaming Collective. This workshop uses sci-fi, noir and dark comedy to create speculative design projects that re-imagine future possibilities. We will incorporate strategies from: Design Fiction, Ethnographic Surrealism’s genre-blurring use of play, and Situationism’s poetic use of psychogeography and drifting. This fictocritical realm allows for an immersive investigation of self and place and how it may be performed, embodied, and mythologized. We will discuss and build on two previous courses that were taught at the University of California, San Diego. Edgeland Futurism and Beach Bodies were cross-border and inter-disciplinary courses that drew on social, cultural, environmental, architectural, and historical elements to re-imagine the future of the California borderland region.
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Jacqueline Wernimont

Jacqueline Wernimont is an assistant professor of English and Digital Humanities at Arizona State University, where she specializes in literary history, feminist digital media, histories of quantification, and technologies of commemoration. 

Jessica Rajko

Jessica Rajko is a performer, choreographer and interdisciplinary digital media artist. As an assistant professor at Arizona State University, her current interests include whole body interaction design, wearable technology design for dance, feminist digital culture, and the human experience of big data. 

Eileen Standley

Eileen Standley is an artist and Clinical Professor who works with a variety of media in performance or installation settings. What she creates is predominantly influenced by her background as a choreographer and dancer. Her work crosses disciplines of dance making, video art, installation, and performance art. 

Ash Eliza Smith

Ash Eliza Smith is a multimedia artist and writer who has explored technology and the body for Vice, Motherboard and Rhizome. She is the current Director for Art and Technology in the Culture, Art and Technology Program at University of California, San Diego, where she teaches courses on storytelling, digital media, film, and speculative design.
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saturday | 10:15 aM - 1:00 PM 

// Hatcher Library Clark Instructional Space, South Side (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

FEMINIST MAPPING WORKSHOP

Feminist Mapping Principles & Practices
Mapping Food, Migration and Difference in Singapore 
A Feminist Mapping of Filmic Narratives
Mapping FemTechNet Landscape

In this workshop, Karen Keifer-Boyd begins with a discussion of feminist principles and practices of mapping and cartography from interacting with several examples, including FTN DOCC mapping projects. Two researchers, Kristy H.A. Kang at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, and Almudena Escribá Maroto, Universidad de Valencia, Spain, present how they use mapping to visualize overlooked histories of ethnic communities and how they claim space in the city, the relationships between politics of location and knowledge in terms of accountability/responsibility, the body, and ideological landmarks. Afterwards, Veronica Paredes and Ann Wu from FemTechNet’s Tech/Praxis Working Group will present a recent initiative of the working group to map FemTechNet’s landscape in terms of hybrid spaces, geographical locations, and privilege/access. The discussion and examples provide the context for experiencing four mapping activities: DOCC’s Situated Knowledges Mapping Project to make visible politics of location and identity; film analysis mapping, mapping potential to change, and mapping FemTechNet landscape.

Feminist Mapping Resources, Processes, Examples

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Karen Keifer-Boyd

Karen Keifer-Boyd is professor of art education and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Penn State. Her website is http://www.personal.psu.edu/ktk2. Tweet her at @chutneypower.  

Kristy H.A. Kang

Dr. Kristy H.A. Kang is a media artist and scholar whose work explores narratives of place and geographies of cultural memory. She is Assistant Professor at the School of Art, Design and Media at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and Associate Director of the Spatial Analysis Lab (SLAB) at the University of Southern California Sol Price School of Public Policy, Los Angeles. 

Almudena Escribá Maroto

Almudena Escribá Maroto, PhD student in Communication and Intercultural at Valencia University (Spain). Official Master in Communication, Intercultural and European Studies, and Graduate in Audiovisual Communication. Her thesis focuses on the discursive analysis of science fiction films using several theoretical fields, like biopolitics, queer, postmodern and poststructural gender theory. 

Veronica Paredes

Veronica Paredes is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Media and Cinema Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she is also affiliated with the Culture and Society thematic area at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). She is a 2015-2016 FemTechNet co-facilitator, along with Anne Cong-Huyen, T.L. Cowan, Paula Gardner and Jasmine Rault. She co-chairs the collective’s Tech Praxis and Wikipedia working groups and is an active member of the Critical Race and Ethnic Studies Committee.   

Ann (Hong-An) Wu

Ann (Hong-An) Wu is a community-based educator, new media artist, and doctoral candidate in art education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her dissertation examines the potential of transforming systems and structures with youth through prosumer development and critical play in community-based settings. Currently, Wu is serving as the Information and Communication Technology Specialist at FemTechNet. Her website is wuhongann.tw.
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saturday | 10:15 aM - 1:00 PM 

// Shapiro Design Lab, Shapiro Library (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

FEMINIST HACKERS WORKSHOP

Freedom Recycling Bin: The Game
FEM:play — Feminist Game Card Hack

Cricket Keating and Melissa Meade will start this workshop with their game Freedom Recycling Bin, developed with their students in their DOCC 2013 class. The game hacks recycling bins as well as the feminist history of “freedom trash cans” at the infamous 1968 Miss America protests to generate play, thought, and discussion about issues of oppression and freedom. They will consider ways to bring this game to our technologically mediated FemTechNet spaces, for play across the network. For the second half of the workshop, Paula Gardner and Emma Westecott will present FEM:play — Feminist Card Game Hack. This workshop presents a deck of cards containing feminist values, concepts and theory that can be played in numerous ways --to be invented by participants!  The game seeks to cross feminist theory into non-academic spaces and to work as a tool for women and transgender folk to address issues in employment, family and social spaces.  The workshop is inspired by three game approaches- Top Trumps, Grow-A-Game, and Metagame (expansion deck); these approaches offer, for example, points for confrontation or values identification rather than “dominating”, and encourage players to hack the rules. In the workshop participants will hack, alter or rebuild the deck to create games we can use ourselves.
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Cricket Keating

Cricket Keating is an Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Ohio State University. 

Melissa Meade

Melissa Meade is an Associate Professor and Chair of Humanities at Colby-Sawyer College. 

Paula Gardner

Paula Gardner is Asper Chair in Communications, in the Department of Communication Studies and Multimedia at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Gardner is a critical feminist media scholar who writes about the ambivalent relationships we have with technologies, particularly biometric devices. Her participatory, multimedia research employs digital and biometric devices critically, seeking to render them accessible and transparent, to engage them in socially interventionist practices, and to consider the abetting role of the aesthetic. 

Emma Westecott

Emma Westecott is Assistant Professor in the Digital Futures Program at OCAD University, Toronto. Emma Westecott's practice-based research celebrates digital games as an expressive art form, considering its potential to extend, enhance and conceive of game forms in new and creative ways. With expertise in arts games, her research focuses on the ongoing, creative evolution of the game form, that can offer new experiences and new human possibilities.
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saturday | 2:00 pM - 5:00 PM 

// Hatcher Library Gallery Instruction Lab, North Side (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

FEMINIST ACTIVISTS WORKSHOP

What’s A Digital Feminist? Experiences of Gender and Labor in the Digital Humanities at the University of North Carolina
Technology, Politics & Play: Understanding the Pedagogical and Political Value of Tinkering

In the Feminist Activists Workshop, Charlotte Fryar and Malina Chavez introduce their research collective, The Digital Feminists of Carolina (DFC), and their case-study of the gendered division of labor in digital humanities. After presenting video clips from interviews, the DFC will discuss their feminist analysis of the themes in the interviews regarding perceptions of collaborative work and how the identity politics of digital labor are both complicated and supported by feminist practices. DFC will then facilitate a discussion with participants on community-building, collaboration, and labor-saving practices that could be enacted by workshop participants at their home institution and have participants practice interviewing skills by asking research questions with each other. Next, in the second half of the workshop, Jessi Ring introduces tinkering, a valuable learning process that disrupts elitist and masculinist innovation narratives by making scientific and technological learning more accessible, collaborative, playful and practical. The tinkering and games, explored in this workshop, demonstrate a unique approach to understanding intersections between various identities and cultural contexts and a wide range of technologies or technological processes – including or related to disability, surveillance, research ethics, and privacy.
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Charlotte Fryar

Charlotte Fryar is a Ph.D. student in the Department of American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). From 2011-2015, Charlotte worked for UNC’s Digital Innovation Lab, which strives to create digital humanities work as public goods. The idea that digital work can and should be public work has influenced how she thinks about digital labor and collaborative project-building. Her primary research interests are in public higher education, campus activism(s), oral history, and new modes of digital scholarship. 

Malina Chavez

Malina Chavez is Program Coordinator for the Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative. With a MFA|EDA from Duke University, she has been a PhD Lab Artist in Residence, teaching assistant in Information Science + Studies (Web Multimedia), Experimental Film, and Cathy Davidson’s groundbreaking Coursera MOOC, The History (and Future) of Higher Education. Her most recent work uses open source surveillance applications to create poetic film and installation projects. 

Jessi Ring

Jessi Ring is a third year PhD student in the Communications program at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada). Her dissertation research explores multiple issues associated with feminist activism, including the binary between politics and play, by exploring American and Canadian feminist hackerspaces.
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saturday | 2:00 pM - 5:00 PM 

// Hatcher Library Gallery, North Side (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

FEMINIST WRITERS WORKSHOP

HAPLAB – Horror and Possibility Sci-Fi Workshop 
Pedagogies of Promotion

This workshop will feature three one-hour interactive sessions. Sophia Bruecker begins with HAPLAB - Horror and Possibility Sci-Fi Workshop to facilitate experimental creative writing using the genre of science fiction. The stories often end up as seeds for later projects. Li Cornfeld continues with Pedagogies of Promotion, experimenting with performative presentations of media technologies. Beginning with an examination of product promotion as a form of capitalist pedagogy, this session will play with strategies for reimagining promotional performances as feminist acts.
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Sophia Brueckner

Sophia Brueckner is an artist, designer, and engineer. Inseparable from computers since the age of two, she believes she is a cyborg. She graduated from MIT and RISD and is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan where she teaches sci-fi and researches the effects of interface design on mental health. 

Li Cornfeld

Li Cornfeld is a PhD candidate at McGill University, where she researches the intersections of media studies and performance studies. Her dissertation investigates live presentations of new technologies in industrial settings: product launches, keynote addresses, trade shows and expos.
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saturday | 2:00 pM - 5:00 PM 

// Shapiro Design Lab, Shapiro Library (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

feminist hackers workshop

Teaching with Twine: An Affective Tool for Exploring Identity 

Twine is an extraordinarily accessible game-making platform based on hypertext narrative; as such, it can be easily used as a pedagogical tool with which to enable students to work through a range of scenarios involving decisions and their repercussions. The affordances of Twine in creating an interactive narrative based on user choices mean it can function as an affective exercise for both makers and players, as they learn what it means to operate from particular identity positions in different societal contexts or scenarios. This workshop led by Karl Surkan explores some examples of student Twine games generated in a DOCC titled “Technology and Culture” at MIT, in which the assignment charged students to explore a technology as it is seen or used in a particular cultural context. Because Twine is a platform that is very good at creating an affective experience for the user, it is therefore helpful in exploring implications of many aspects of user experience – specifically how and by whom technologies are used. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to work with the Twine platform and discuss how to incorporate in their teaching, and collaboratively in future DOCCs.
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Karl Surkan

Karl Surkan has been teaching in the Program in Women's and Gender Studies at MIT for the past 11 years and loves to try out new pedagogical experiments! His research interests include new media activism and online social movements, feminist media studies, technology studies, queer/trans politics and representation, reproductive technologies, and most recently wearable technologies and epatient communities and health activism.
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saturday | 5:30 pM - 6:30 PM 

/// Michigan League, Ballroom (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

DOCCs in Action

The first Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC) was launched in 2013 by FemTechNet on the topic of “dialogues in feminism and technology.” A DOCC recognizes and is built on the understanding that expertise is distributed throughout a network, among participants situated in diverse institutional contexts, within diverse material, geographic, and national settings, and who embody and perform diverse identities. This session focuses on experimenting with the DOCC structure, and/or collaborating in its shared learning activities across courses. This full group gathering is an opportunity to highlight and share experiences from DOCC instructors teaching or facilitating this year, and to make connections to the concerns, rewards and challenges identified from previous iterations of the DOCC. Instructors from the DOCC’s past, present and future are enthusiastically invited to join the conversation!
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Anita Say Chan

Anita Say Chan is an Assistant Research Professor of Communications in the Department of Media and Cinema Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research and teaching interests include globalization and digital cultures, innovation networks and the “periphery”, science and technology studies in Latin America, and hybrid pedagogies in building digital literacies. She received her PhD in 2008 from the MIT Doctoral Program in History; Anthropology; and Science, Technology, and Society. Her first book the competing imaginaries of global connection and information technologies in network-age Peru, Networking Peripheries: Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism was released by MIT Press in 2014. 

Diana Mincyte

Diana Mincyte is an Assistant Professor of sociology in at The City University of New York - NYC College of Technology. Her research examines environmental and justice dimensions of agro-food systems in eastern Europe and the United States. Her publications include articles in Agriculture and Human Values, Sociologia Ruralis, Slavic Review, Gastronomica, Environment and Planning A and D, among others, book chapters, and several guest-edited special issues. 

Carrie Rentschler

Carrie Rentschler is Associate Professor and William Dawson Scholar of Feminist Media Studies in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University.  She is the author of Second Wounds: Victims’ Rights and the Media in the U.S. (Duke UP, 2011), and co-editor of Girlhood Studies and the Politics of Place (Berghahn Press, 2016). Her current research examines the construction of the bystander as an agent of social change, the role humour plays in feminist social media responses to rape culture, and the work media infrastructures and distribution do across a range of social movement activism.  

Marla Jaksch

Dr. Marla Jaksch is an associate professor in the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department, with affiliate appointments in the African American Studies Department and the International Studies Program's Africa concentration at The College of New Jersey. Her research interests include neocolonialism, development, and digital cultures; science and technology studies in sub-Saharan Africa; and transnational feminisms and digital media. 

Ivette Bayo Urban

Ivette Bayo Urban is a doctoral candidate at the Information School at University of Washington. Ivette believes in the liberatory and transformative power of information and education. Her scholarship focusing on community informatics, community based collaborative spaces and she is interested in boundary spanning work. Her work explores the complex relationships of technology access and use, from perspectives of cultures, identities and genders. She is a feminist and indigenist scholar attentive to the complex and uneven relations that are embedded in socio-technical systems. Ivette an affiliate member of the Indigenous Information Research Group (IIRG), and co-chair of FemTechNet’s Pedagogy Projects Committee.
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sunday | 10:00 aM - 11:00 aM 

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

KEYNOTE DIALOGUE: “Organic Intellectualism: DJ Scholarship, Black Feminism and Erasure Resistance”

DJ Lynnée Denise creates multi- dimensional and multi-sensory experiences that require audiences to apply critical thinking to how the arts can hold viable solutions to social inequality. Her work is inspired by underground cultural movements, the 1980s, migration studies, theories of escape, and electronic music of the African Diaspora. With support from the Jerome Foundation, The Astrae Lesbian Foundation for Justice, Idea Capital, The BiljmAIR artist residency (Netherlands) and The Rauschenberg Artists as Activists Grant, she has been able to resource her performative research on a local, national and global level. She’s the product of the Historically Black Fisk University with a MA from the historically radical San Francisco State University Ethnic Studies Department.
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Lynnee Denise

DJ Lynnée Denise is a Visiting Artist at California State University’s Pan African Studies Department and its Chicano Studies Department. DJ Lynnée Denise is an artist and scholar who incorporates self-directed project based research into interactive workshops, music events and public lectures that provide the opportunity to develop an intimate relationship with under-explored topics related to the cultural history of marginalized communities.

DJ Lynnee Denise Website

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SUNDAY | 11:30 aM - 12:30 PM 

// Michigan LeagueKoessler Room (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

DIALOGUE SESSION 1:
FTN DOCC
PEDAGOGICAL EXPERIMENTS

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Karen Keifer-Boyd

Karen Keifer-Boyd is professor of art education and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Penn State. Her website is http://www.personal.psu.edu/ktk2. Tweet her at @chutneypower.  

Sarah Fox 

Sarah Fox is a PhD candidate working in the Tactile and Tactical (TAT) Design Lab at the University of Washington, where she conducts a broad range of research at the intersection of design intervention and inquiry. She holds a Master's degree in Digital Media from the Georgia Institute of Technology, where she was a part of the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing. She has worked with the Human Experience and Design group at Microsoft Research and the Interaction and Experience Research group at Intel Labs.
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SUNDAY | 11:30 aM - 12:30 PM 

// Michigan League, Room D (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

DIALOGUE SESSION 2:
FTN DOCC PRIVACY AND TRANSPARENCY IN THE NETWORK

As part of the Operation committee's ongoing discussion about the tensions between privacy and transparency in FemTechNet, we are looking for your opinions!  Please join this Dialogue Session to reflect on these issues and help the Operations committee, who are looking to build an understanding about how people in the Network feel about the ways that we deal with privacy and transparency in the Network.
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Ashley Walker

Ashley Walker is a PhD student in the Media, Technology and Society program at Northwestern University. She has been involved as a senior project manager with FemTechNet for the last two and a half years. Her interests include group privacy norms, technological infrastructure, and the social media ecosystem.
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SUNDAY | 11:30 aM - 12:30 PM 

// Michigan LeagueRoom C (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

DIALOGUE SESSION 3:
FTN DOCC STATEMENTS OF SOLIDARITY

This session takes up the question of when and why FemTechNet should issue statements of solidarity, support, protest, etc. That is, for what reasons, and on what topics, do we see ourselves called, as a network, to speak out? We have not made a habit of issuing statements in the past, but perhaps should? Would you like to see FTN circulate a statement on a particular issue right now?
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Alexandra Juhasz

Alexandra Juhasz is Professor of Media Studies at Pitzer College. She makes and studies committed media practices that contribute to political change and individual and community growth: http://pzacad.pitzer.edu/~ajuhasz. Her current work is on and about feminist Internet culture including YouTube (https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/learning-youtube-0) and feminist pedagogy and community (www.feministonlinespaces.com). With Anne Balsamo, she was founding co-facilitator of FemTechNet.  

Jasmine Rault

Jasmine Rault is one of the FemTechNet co-facilitators this year. She works at the New School in New York City, where she teaches feminist, queer, anti-racist activist and intellectual histories in the department of Culture and Media studies. She is working on a book project, tentatively entitled, Unsettling Affects: Transnational Mediations of Feminist and Queer Activism, and a co-authored book with T.L. Cowan, Checking In: Feminist Labor in Networked Economies.
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SUNDAY | 11:30 aM - 12:30 PM 

// Michigan League,Henderson Room  (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

 

DIALOGUE SESSION 4:
FTN DOCC VIDEO DIALOGUES & THEMES

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Marla Jaksch

Dr. Marla Jaksch is an associate professor in the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department, with affiliate appointments in the African American Studies Department and the International Studies Program's Africa concentration at The College of New Jersey. Her research interests include neocolonialism, development, and digital cultures; science and technology studies in sub-Saharan Africa; and transnational feminisms and digital media.
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schedule

schedule

Friday Panels
FemTechNet’s conference on Feminist Pedagogy, Technology, and Transdisciplinarity begins with four panels on Friday, which introduces the DOCC, explores issues of labor, and pedagogical possibilities through mapping and activism.

Saturday Workshops
On Saturday we will be making and working together in workshops on feminist mapping, writing, wikistorming, exquisite engendering, and hACTIVISM. The purpose of the workshops is to experience a range of DOCC pedagogical approaches based in DOCC pedagogical principles, and to engage in collaborations and create situated knowledge.

Sunday Dialogues
Sunday’s dialogues will be activated by the signal/noise performative radnote dialogue of Lynnee Denise with Marla Jaksch, followed by modulated grooves of small group discussions brought back to the full circle of participation.

FRIDAY, APRIL 8

2:10 PM - 3:00 PM

Introduction to FemTechNet’s DOCC & Conference Overview

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor) // Join Virtually

Panelists: Lisa Nakamura (University of Michigan); Karen Keifer-Boyd (Penn State); Marla Jaksch (The College of New Jersey); Veronica Paredes (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign); Karl Surkan (MIT); T.L. Cowan (Yale)

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

signal/noise Launch Party

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)

Presenters: signal/noise Editorial Collective

Saturday, APRIL 9

10:00 AM - 10:15 AM

Workshop Intro + Coffee

// Shapiro Design Lab, Shapiro Library (1st Floor)

10:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Exquisite Engendering Workshop

// Hatcher Library Gallery, North Side (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

Feminist Mapping Workshop

// Hatcher Library Clark Instructional Space, South Side (2nd Floor)
// Join Virtually

Feminist Hackers Workshop

// Shapiro Design Lab, Shapiro Library (1st Floor)
// Join Virtually

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

lunch (provided)

// Hatcher Library Gallery, North Side(1st Floor)

5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

DOCCs in Action

// Michigan League, Ballroom (2nd Floor) // Join Virtually

Facilitators: Anita Say Chan (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign); Diana Mincyte (CUNY, College of Technology, New York); Carrie Rentschler (McGill University); Marla Jaksch (The College of New Jersey); Ivette Bayo Urban (University of Washington)

6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

catered reception + music

// Michigan League, Ballroom (2nd Floor)

DJ Stacey "Hotwaxx" Hale

sunday, APRIL 10

9:00 aM - 10:00 aM

breakfast (provided)

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor)

10:00 aM - 11:00 aM

radnote Dialogue: “Organic Intellectualism: DJ Scholarship, Black Feminism and Erasure Resistance”

// Michigan League, Vandenberg Room (2nd Floor) // Watch Recording

Lynnee Denise
DJ Lynnée Denise is a Visiting Artist at California State University’s Pan African Studies Department
and its Chicano Studies Department. DJ Lynnée Denise is an artist and scholar who incorporates
Lynnee Deniseself-directed project based research into interactive workshops, music events and public lectures that provide the opportunity to develop an intimate relationship with under-explored topics related to the cultural history of marginalized communities. She creates multi- dimensional and multi-sensory experiences that require audiences to apply critical thinking to how the arts can hold viable solutions to social inequality. Her work is inspired by underground cultural movements, the 1980s, migration studies, theories of escape, and electronic music of the African Diaspora. With support from the Jerome Foundation, The Astrae Lesbian Foundation for Justice, Idea Capital, The BiljmAIR artist residency (Netherlands) and The Rauschenberg Artists as Activists Grant, she has been able to resource her performative research on a local, national and global level. She’s the product of the Historically Black Fisk University with a MA from the historically radical San Francisco State University Ethnic Studies Department. Her website is here

11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Dialogue session 1:
FTN DOCC
pedagogical experiments

// Michigan LeagueKoessler Room (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

Facilitator: Karen Keifer-Boyd 
Discussant: Sarah Fox

Dialogue session 2:
FTN DOCC privacy and transparency in the Network

// Michigan League, Room D (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

Facilitator: Ashley Walker

Dialogue session 3:
FTN DOCC statements of solidarity

// Michigan LeagueRoom C (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

Facilitators: Alex Juhasz & 
Jasmine Rault

Dialogue session 4:
FTN DOCC video dialogues & themes

// Michigan League, Henderson Room  (3rd Floor)
// Join Virtually

Facilitator: Marla Jaksch

12:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Lunch Buffet 

// Michigan League, Concourse (2nd Floor)

Presentation from breakout sessions

// Michigan League, Hussey Room (2nd Floor)

video dialogues

A conference at Brown University that launched the video dialogues. L to R, back row: Kara Keeling, Wendy Chun, Faith Wilding; L to R, front row: Maria Fernandez, Anne Balsamo, Lisa Nakamura

A conference at Brown University that launched the video dialogues.
L to R, back row: Kara Keeling, Wendy Chun, Faith Wilding; L to R, front row: Maria Fernandez, Anne Balsamo, Lisa Nakamura

Dialogue and interchange are key aspects of FemTechNet. During 2012-2013, we produced at least four dialogues, on Labor, Race, Sexualities, and Machine. The Dialogues are on the FemTechNet Vimeo channel as well as hosted on a site that enables captions with transcripts, here. Other topics include: Archive, Wikistorming, Bodies, Difference, Place, Systems, Transformations, and Games.

Each Video Dialogue features two prominent feminist scholars/artists/practitioners in conversation about a topic.  The topics for the Video Dialogues were “community-sourced” based on discussions among FemTechNet participants in July-Sept 2012.

Topics discussed in each Video Dialogue are intentionally broad and should be understood as a starting point for further discussion among DOCC participants.

 

Ready for filming the video dialogue on Bodies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. L to R: Dorothy Roberts, Karen Flynn, and Sharon Irish

Ready for filming the video dialogue on Bodies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. L to R: Dorothy Roberts, Karen Flynn, and Sharon Irish

2013-2014

DOCC 2013: Dialogues on Feminism and Technology

In 2013, FemTechNet initiated a networked learning experiment involving instructors and students from several institutions in the creation of a collaborative open course structure called a DOCC:  Distributed Open Collaborative Course on the topic of Dialogues on Feminism and Technology.

The first iteration of the DOCC 2013 took place from September-December, 2013. Ideas for DOCC courses to interact are listed here, with instructions. 

Feminism and feminists have been integral to technology innovation, yet as recently as June 2012, the New York Times carried an article about Silicon Valley that opened with the line:  “Men invented the Internet.”  As technology remakes academia and the arts, critical analysis of gender, sexualities, and race have been absent in much of this re-thinking of disciplines and practices. Since the early years of Internet availability, cyberfeminists have explored the use of the Internet for dialogue and participation across various socio-economic layers worldwide. Access and skills for women and various economically underprivileged communities of the world (such as populations from the developing world and inner cities of the U.S.) were central concerns for feminists in developing distributed and participatory environments for learning, training and information exchange.

Since the mid 1990s, cyberfeminists have spent significant time and energy in developing methods for inclusive teaching. The DOCC 2013 has been created as an alternative genre of MOOC, to demonstrate the innovative process of feminist thinking that engages issues of networked infrastructures for learning, learner-centered pedagogies, collaborative knowledge creation, and transformational practices of design and media making.

A MOOC (massive open online course) is typically organized and branded by a single (elite) institution. A DOCC recognizes and is built on the understanding that expertise is distributed throughout a network, among participants situated in diverse institutional contexts, within diverse material, geographic, and national settings, and who embody and perform diverse identities (as teachers, as students, as media-makers, as activists, as trainers, as members of various publics, for example).

The organization of a DOCC addresses the collaborative nature of learning in a digital age.  A DOCC is an alternative genre of MOOC.  A MOOC (massive open online course) is pedagogically centralized and branded by a single institution. The fundamental difference is that a DOCC recognizes and is built on the understanding that expertise is distributed throughout a network, among participants situated in diverse institutional contexts, within diverse material, geographic, and national settings, and who embody and perform diverse identities (as teachers, as students, as media-makers, as activists, as trainers, as members of various publics, for example). The organization of a DOCC addresses the collaborative nature of learning in a digital age. The DOCC2013 engages participants (from North America in this version) to teach NODAL courses, each of which is configured within a particular educational institutional setting. There is no single credit granting institution. Credit is offered to students through mechanisms that are already established within particular/situated institutions.

Instructors at fifteen universities and colleges participated in the DOCC 2013.  Each instructor of a NODAL course created a course that suited her or his students, institution, locale, and discipline. FemTechNet delivered ten weeks of course content covering both the historical and cutting edge scholarship on technology produced through art, science, and visual studies.  The core content consisted of 10 Video Dialogues that feature discussions among prominent and innovative thinkers and artists who address the question of technology through feminist frameworks.  Course content grew through the exchange among participants. Dialogues on Feminism and Technology used technology to enable interdisciplinary and international conversation while privileging situated diversity and networked agency.

FemTechNet facilitated a shared pedagogical activity called Storming Wikipedia designed to write women and feminist scholarship of science and technology back into our web-based cultural archives. By engaging in the practices of editing and revising Wikipedia pages, participants address the gendered division of labor of online encyclopedia authoring and editing which is skewed now toward male participation. Through the Storming Wikipedia activities we also seek to engage a wider group of participants in the effort of writing and maintaining a digital archive of feminist work in science, technology and media so that the histories of the future will be well populated by the ideas and people who took feminism seriously as a source of inspiration and innovation in the creation of new technocultures.

Because FemTechNet is a network, we refer to our convenings–whether institutional or community-based–as nodes. Below  are the locations of the 2013-14 nodes.

 

nodes

Alternative Venues

  • Sharon Collingwood, Minerva OSU
  • Course Title: Dialogues on Feminism and Technology, in Second Life
  • Number of Students: TBD
  • Level: All levels
  • Working Committees: Accessibility
  • Stephanie Rosen, Northampton, MA
  • Course Title: Mass FemTechNet
  • Number of Students: TBD
  • Levels: Adult
  • Working Committees: Accessibility

Bowling Green State University

  • Radhika Gajjala
  • Course Title: Feminism and Technology (Fully Online Course)
  • Number of Students: 15
  • Level: Undergraduate
  • Working Committees: WikiStorming, Video, Steering

Brown University

California Polytechnic State University

  • Jane Lehr and Sandi Clement
  • Course Title: Gender, Race, Science and Technology
  • Number of Students: 32-40
  • Level: 300-level/ Junior
  • Working Committees: Pedagogy, Commons, Assessment
  • Jane Lehr and Michael Haungs
  • Course Title: Project-Based Learning in Liberal Arts and Engineering Studies
  • Number of Students: 15-20
  • Level: 300-level/Junior
  • Working Committees: Pedagogy, Commons, Assessment

California State University, Fullerton

  • Karyl Ketchum
  • Course Title: Gender and Technoculture
  • Number of Students: 35 in each of two sections
  • Level: Undergraduate
  • Working Committees: Communications

Colby-Sawyer College

  • Melissa Meade
  • Course Title: Gender and Technoculture
  • Number of Students: 8
  • Level: Undergraduate
  • Working Committees: WikiStorming, White Paper

The Graduate Center, CUNY

  • Kathlene McDonald
  • Course Title: Feminism and Technology
  • Number of Students: 8
  • Level: Offered in Women’s Studies Doctoral Certificate Program
  • Working Committees: Archive, Assessment, Steering

Macaulay Honors College, CUNY

  • Lisa Brundage
  • Course Title: Imagining Gender: Exploring Narratives of Technology
  • Number of Students: TBD
  • Level: Undergraduate
  • Working Committees: Pedagogy, Commons

Ohio State University

Ontario College of Art and Design University

  • Maria-Belen Ordonez
  • Course Title: Dialogues on Feminism and Technology
  • Number of Students: 9
  • Level: Graduate
  • Support from: Caroline Langill and Paula Gardner
  • Working Committees: MBO: Communication; PG: Communications, Video

Pennsylvania State University

  • Karen Keifer-Boyd (lead) with Jennifer Wagner-Lawler and Eileen Trauth
  • Course Title: Gender, Art & STEM
  • Number of Students: 6
  • Level:  Graduate
  • Working Committees:  KKB: Pedagogy

Pitzer College

Rutgers University

  • Karen Alexander and Elaine Zundl
  • Course Title: Gender Race and Techno-culture
  • Number of Students: 2 (taught as independent study)
  • Level: TBD
  • Working Committees: KA: Pedagogy; EZ: Pedagogy, Assessment, WikiStorming

The New School

  • Anne Balsamo and Veronica Paredes
  • Course Title: Dialogues on Feminism and Technology
  • Number of Students: 17
  • Level: Undergraduate
  • Working Committees: AB: Commons, Video, Steering; VP: Commons, Archive, Video, Student

University of California, San Diego 

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

  • Sharon Irish, Sharra Vostral and CL Cole
  • Course Title: Dialogues on Feminism and Technology
  • Number of Students: 18
  • Level: Graduate
  • Working Committees: SI: Communication, Archive, Steering; CLC: White Paper
  • CL Cole
  • Course Title: Digital and Gendered Cultures
  • Number of Students: 24
  • Level: Undergraduate

Yale University