Welcome to FemTechNet!

FemTechNet logo 2013

On this website you will find many resources for learning more about feminism, cyberfeminism, and feminist theories of technology, including videos with major scholars and subject matter experts, reading lists and bibliographies, projects to do with classmates or undertake on your own as a do-it-yourselfer, and syllabi from past and present FemTechNet classes.  You will also find a manifesto, a technical report, and a section called “Who We Are” to help you get oriented.  

Most of all, we want to help you find the most important resource that FemTechNet offers: people in the FemTechNet community.


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A Feminist Programming Language?

By Ari Schlesinger, Claremont Colleges

While it may make the most sense to start at the beginning, I have to say, I never expected two hundred and fifty words posted to HASTAC to spark such a flame.

When I first thought about feminism and programming languages in the beta DOCC (Distributive Open Collaborative Course) I was inspired. I had found an idea that spoke to me; an idea that I knew was big and complicated and important. Before that class I hadn’t spent much time at all thinking about feminism. The DOCC helped me uncover critical, feminist frameworks through which to interpret the world. Frameworks that provided me with structured (yet unstructured) ways to theorize about things that I had already been trying to describe, frameworks I felt a kinship with.

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Notes from #FTNSummer Workshop

By Veronica Paredes, The New School

Thank you so much to everyone who was able to participate in the FemTechNet Summer 2014 Workshop last week! I have put together a table of contents document that links to the notes taken over the week. This document also contains links to some of the Blue Jeans recordings that were captured over the week. You can also find a folder with these recordings here.

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DOCC 2014 Summer Workshop

Come to the FemTechNet DOCC 2014 Summer Workshop!
Dates: Mon Jun 9 – Thurs. Jun 13

In fall 2013, FemTechNet, a coalition of feminist scholars and teachers, launched its first DOCC: Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC). An explicitly feminist response to trends in teaching and technology (including MOOCs), the decentralized approach to technology and pedagogy puts participants in dialogue with one another and fosters multi-directional learning relationships. Much of the distributed work for this project was done over a one-week summer workshop in July 2013; over this week, we also built personal connections that have sustained us as we have worked together throughout the year.

SNAP DOCC 2013 Workshop Anne & Alex

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Tribute to Adrianne Wadewitz

Written by Alex Juhasz and Anne Balsamo

It is with grief and shock that FemTechNet marks the untimely death of our remarkable collaborator and colleague, Dr. Adrianne Wadewitz. Within our community of feminist scholars, artists and activists, she was a leader, innovator, and expert. Her work for FemTechNet, collaborating with other instructors and students on our Wikistorming Committee, had deep impact for our community, and will have lasting effect as feminists around the world continue to follow her lead as they add feminist voices, influences, histories, and theories into Wikipedia.

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Online Learning Summit

By Alexandra Juhasz, Pitzer College

FemTechNet, collaborative makers of “the anti-MOOC,” were graciously, no I’d even say studiously received by leaders of the bellies-of-the-beast at last weekend’s Online Learning Summit, hosted by Berkeley, Harvard, MIT, and Stanford (the great research institutions who put money and a spotlight on what would first be the year, but quickly the boondoggle of, the MOOC.). President Hennessy of Stanford started us off by indicating that the Massive of MOOCs should really be rethought as the moderate; and Open ended up generating a host of problems people hadn’t quite predicted (particularly the great differences of skills, knowledge, and attention of the masses who came; demonstrating “a dynamic range of ability.”)

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MOOCing the Prison?

By Alexandra Juhasz, Pitzer College

My last post, MOOCing the Liberal Arts? concluded with this suggestion: “For those of us in higher education, including our students, our work is to provide MOOC alternatives by using technology, and other means, to improve what we do and to open access to what we have.”

Today, along with four of my students and a visiting scholar, Gabrielle Foreman, we taught our first of seven classes on Technology at the Norco prison. A little background: our class is one of many being offered through the PEP program (Prison Education Program), run through the visionary leadership of Dr. Renford Reese at Cal Poly Pomona. “The overarching philosophy of PEP is to use the resources in the backyard of each of the state’s prisons to make change e.g. university student and faculty volunteers. There is a college within a 15-20 mile radius of each of the state’s 33 prisons. PEP’s goal is to collaborate with these colleges to assist the CDCR in reducing recidivism in the state by 1% by 2015.” Our class “Technology in Prison,” is a seminar connected to the yearly speaker’s series that I run as director of the Munroe Center for Social Inquiry at Pitzer, this year’s theme being Technology. For seven weeks, some of my speakers and students from the seminar will move our inquiry in place to see how our conversations change, and expand, when engaged with a student population denied access to most of the (digital) technologies that those of us on the outside now take for granted.

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High Impact Practices: Experiential Learning

By Jade Ulrich, Pitzer College

On Friday, January 31, 2014, Susie Ferrell and I attended “High Impact Practices: Interdisciplinary collaborations and creative connections,” an experiential learning conference at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). We presented on a panel entitled “DOCCs: The Dialogues on Feminism and Technology Project” along with Professor Liz Losh (UCSD) and graduate students Monika Sengul-Jones and Erika Cheng (both UCSD). This was Susie and my third time representing FemTechNet at academic conferences; and this conference certainly didn’t disappoint.

UCSDJan2014Conf

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Blogging (as) Feminist Digital Pedagogy

By Alexandra Juhasz, Pitzer College

Enjoying a much-deserved drink with highly-Twitterate Jessie Daniels (@JessieNYC) after a few days of talk, workshops, and video dialogues in Ann Arbor, Michigan about Feminist Digital Pedagogies, I was discussing with her the changing culture of blogging, and other social media forms in relation to our own ever-changing digital metronomes. Which is a fancy way to say here what I said there: “I always used to blog about conferences, but now it feels like it takes too long to blog; the work is too hard. What’s the deal with this quickening?”

Digital Pedagogies Panel, University of Michigan, L to R: Inderpal Grewal, Laura Wexler, Lisa Nakamura, Maria Cotera

Digital Pedagogies Panel, University of Michigan,
L to R: Inderpal Grewal, Laura Wexler, Lisa Nakamura, Maria Cotera

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Feminist Digital Pedagogies in the Polar Vortex

By Sharon Irish, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

On January 22, 2014,  I arrived in Ann Arbor, Michigan, courtesy of Lisa Nakamura, for a two-day event, “Feminist Digital Pedagogies,” that she organized with colleagues at the University of Michigan. Jessie Daniels (CUNY) was not able to make it to Ann Arbor in time to give her keynote—due to storms in New York–but she did make it for a dinner with us that evening.

Dinner with participants in Ann Arbor, Michigan, prior to Feminist Digital Pedagogies conference. L to R: Faithe Day, Andre Brock, Jessie Daniels, Carrie Rentschler, Sharon Irish, Lisa Nakamura, Jessica Moorman

Dinner with participants in Ann Arbor, Michigan, prior to Feminist Digital Pedagogies conference. L to R: Faithe Day, Andre Brock, Jessie Daniels, Carrie Rentschler, Sharon Irish, Lisa Nakamura, Jessica Moorman

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